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Full text of "The Tower, 1928"



- . <L t^u 



The TOWER 

Vo lume Nineteen 



+ 

















_^~^ 



Win. F. Jahnke 

Editor 

i. Spccrstra 
' lanager 



* 
















The 1928 

TOWER 







\ 




Annual Publication o! 
Senior Class 
of 



The 
STOUT INSTITUTE 



MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN. 












S 




--T^B* 'Tsar- ,W^W9^^ ' 






FOREWORD 

To record in enduring and 
organized form the personnel 
of The Stout Institute and its 
activities for the school year of 
1927-1928 has been the pur- 
pose in preparing this edition 
of THE TOWER 















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CONTENTS 



The SCHOOL 

Scenery 
Faculty 
Classes 

SCHOOL LIFE 

Organizations 
Athletics 

FEATURES 

Memories 
Menomonie 


















































DEDICATION^* 




h e 



(_/ W h. IX 











K 



Miss Ruth Michaels 



\rt, 






51The TOWER 
















SZZZ3HHZEZ 



•TOWER- 




■4,-f *«ff. • 















I! 



















Where the pines have fallen on the 
hillside 

The green needles burning in the sun 

Make sweet incense in the vacant 

spaces 
Along the run 

Of the rill; and by the rill side 
Rushes waver and shine; 
In remote and shad) places 
Winter green abounds and interlaces 
With the twinfiower vine. 




Away,awa} from men and towns, 

To the wild wood and the plains — 
To the pools where winter rains 
Image all their roof of leaves. 

Where the melting hoar-frost nets 
The daisy-star that never sets, 
And wind-flowers and violets 

Crown the pale year weak and new 



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rrr m ■ i im ■ - ■ ti i n i m 



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1 


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flMMfl^H 




'V ■'. ,' ; "'* ,>M 






THE RED CEDAR 



/ think that I shall never see 
A poem loi el) as a tree. 

A tree whose hungry month is prest 
Against the sweet earth* s flowing 
breast; 

A tree that looks at God all day, 
And lifts her leafy arms to pray; 

A tree that may in summer wear 
A nest of whins in her hair; 

Upon whose bosom snow has lain; 
Who intimately lives with rain. 

Poems are made by fools like me, 
But only God can make a tree. 













-~ 






Yesterday the twig was brown and 

bare; 
To-day the glint of green is there; 
Tomorrow will be leaflets spare; 
I know no thing so wondrous fair, 
No miracle so strangely rare. 













The I 



The TOWER 1 ^, 














ON THE BANKS OF THE WINDING SI 



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The TOWER K~ "- -^ -- 



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THE PRESIDENT'S WISH 

f^T\ O man >s to be envied whose success in life has been attained at the expense 
^•1 of sincere and honest friendships. No matter what his wealth or station that 

*• man who can forget the friendships of youth has in him elements of selfish- 
ness, conceit, and false pride which must forever hold him stranger to 
genuine happiness. In such cases his temperament forbids the affection and intimacy 
of "pals." It becomes particularly hard for him to make new friends who will be 
genuine and permanent. 

Success in life is always applauded. But purchased at the expense of love and af- 
fection, it comes too high. Without friendships life becomes dull and uninteresting. 
In late years new friends arc hard to make. Such friends arc lost as easily as they 
arc found. 

A very sensible wish at this time when separations arc natural and necessary is 
that the school-day friendship— the friendship of youth — may for the class of 1928 
continue for a half century to hold in pleasant memory the associations of these four 
years and that there may be frequent meetings when the play spirit may prevail and 
buoyancy of youth assert itself in varied expression of happiness and joy. May the 
friendships of youth maintain. 



J 



ISR 






-N. 



r h 












Ci iroi a. Boi u >\ 

Director of Industrial Arts, Industrial Educa- 
tion 



Rl'ltl \1l< MM ! S 

Director of Home Economics, Hon* 
nomici Education 



1 III l>\ llM I Rfl» 

Physical Training 



( i \k\ BOUCHTOM 

Home Economics Education 



Wai iik B. Davison 
Social Sciences 



Akimir (i. Broun 

i ion 



1 ouisi Bc< hanan 

Foods 



I ii i ian Carson 

Related Ar: 



C.i kiki in ( \i : mi \s 
English 1 itcraiurc 



M. Wiwosa c mm 
Nutrition 



















Page 17 



T O W E R 
















Hatty Dsnmnc 



Fred L CURRAK 

Practice Teaching Superrition, Education 



i 



Own I GRI i N 

Drawing 



G*A< i M. IX>m- 
Director of Dorm 



Dunlap 
aching 



J*Cf 2p Ou 






h*/ iA* '- 




^y, tilf> 



u. M. Hanson 



H\kl K 

Public Speaking 



Hacui 
Printing 






Harry F. Good 

. hanks, Electrical Tork 


















1 T h 



□ 






^ 









Lillian Jeter 
Clothing 



Thos. V. Johnston* 
Woodwork, Sheet Metal 



Mary M. McCalmont 
Chemistry 



Freda Bachmaxn 

Biological Science* 



Ray F. Kranzvsch 
Home Mechanic 



Mabei I 
Chemistry 



lOHN 

Chemistry 



Metal « 



Cordllia K 

Home Administration 



Mary I. McFadden 

Education 













l^g^o 



Pate 19 



v 







Gl ORCI Mil i i k 
Physical Training 



II ( . MlLNEJ 
Metal Work 



Di 1 1 \ Payni 

Institutional Administration 



I'm I ( . Nil SON 
Woodwork, Drawing 



S. I . Pu i U! 
English, Athletics 



Mamii Mir/ 
Related An 



C.k \< i Prk i 

Home Economics Education 



Helen Sam hi r 
English Composition 



Fiora Snovdi n 
Clothing 



I . I . TurnsoN 
ApphcJ Scicneei 



/ 






Page fo 



r h 












N \ : 1 1 \ : i \ \ 
Pre-Parental Education 



I i : in W M s.»€ 

Hon.. - Education 



Clam M. Ml 
Nunc 



Roblri I . Welch 

Vocational Education 



B. M. Funk 

Bu*inct< Manager 



I n LIAN M. Froccai 
Librarian 



Mvm: i M. Bi i HOI 
Registrar 



Mina UtDH 
Executive Secretary 



Chmstim Maim hi 
int librarian 



A'.m - WlNSTON 
Stenographer 













Pag€ 21 



-. 







JVLM 1 

Stenographer 



Edith M. Dennixc 
Stenographer 




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si NIORS 

HOL'CiHTS of the future bring memories of the past and as our Senior year 
draws CO .1 close, we, the Senior C Jass of 1928, have happy memories of 
accomplishments, lasting friendships, and associations at our Alma Mater. 



During all of cur college days we have striven to stand together, but in 
this, our Senior year, we have made a special effort to strengthen the bond through the 
dinner meetings held each month in the Band Box. The Class of 1928 has the dis- 
tinction of being the first class to adopt the Senior jacket a> the official badge of Senior 
rank. The wearers of the Senior jacket are « he dignity and respect due them. 

The class has also been honored by being the first to wear the new official Stout pin. 

We have endeavored to live up to the trad. lions of the school, to incorporate in 
our standards the ideals of the administration, and to so prepare ourselves for future 
work that we shall be trail bla/ers in new ventures for The Stout Institute, the pioneer 
in Industrial Education. 

I: is our hope that future classes will grow in strength and numbers and that they 
will "carry on" in the college as we hope to do in the field. 



( iass OFFICERS 

II. ( . Wamsli s - - - - 
(,! \l»s Appell - 

I.i 1 WOK Avi RILL - - - - 

F. R. Van An in 

Miss ( .: \.i\ BOI GHTON, Mk. [OHN I Wll II 



President 
Vice 

s retar) 

isltrt-r 
Faculty Advisors 





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i T h 



TOWER n 



GLADYS Ait-mi. - Peoria, Illinois 

H cwy 

H. E. Club, S. M. A. 
She has a feeling for the artistic in lift. 



tikiN I. AusTiRun - - Maitell, Wisconsin 

"QsttV 

Y. M. C. A., Rifle Club 

/ or be n a quiet kind 

Wltose future never varies. 



Georoi C. Decker - - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

"Deck" 

S. S. A. President 

A knowing, well-known man. 



KM Aver, ill - - Mejioraonie, Wisconsin 

S M A. H I. Club, Stoutonia Staff 
Oft within wj bruin, I genii 1 ) think a thought. 



(.111 G. Banks - - - I yn.l. Minnesota 

Arcme. S. M. A., H. E. Club, Y. W. C. A.. 
Assoc, Editor of Tower, Stout Student Adviso- 
ry Board. 

Careful, cnitrfcaus, competent. 



Horace. H, Heiden - - Mankato, Minnetots 
M. A. P., Y. M. C. A.. Rifle Club 
i am small, but remember Ntpoleon. 



Robert Healt - froowooi, Michigan 

"Bob" 

Metallurgy 
He correlates hit curricular and extra-curricular ac- 
ta ities. 



Corene L. Baymxcir - Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 
"Babe" 
Stoutonia, Inky Fingers, W. A. A., Cheer Lead- 
er, M. A. P., II. E. Club 
With \im enough to make tbtHgt go, iwJ worth that 
make* us tout bet so. 



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CLARA K. BOLAND 



Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 



"Krl- 

V- W. C A., Science Club 
S I hai e heard of the latly, and good words go « Ub 
her name. 



GlIBBDON Ivfns - - Stockholm, Wisconsin 

"Happy" 
Studious and ever striving, 
Alw4yt at success arriving. 



Martin Jackson - - Little Falls, Minnesota 

"lack" 
Football, Basket-Ball 

He is neither shy, nor bold, hut simply .«r//- possessed. 



Gir prude Burt - - Markesan, Wisconsin 

Inky Fingers, H. E. Club 

She who t*yt laui will be least often quoted. 



Guuelma Fisher - - Ladysmith, Wisconsin 

"I I in.t" 

H. E. Club, Y. V. C. A., Science Club 
Rather quiet hut an admirable girl. 



Glrald L. V. Lunci 



Menomonic, Wisconsin 



"jerry" 

1 Editor-in-Chief of Stoutonia 

A capable editor and a clever trtilt, 



William F. Jahnke - - Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

"Bill" 

I ilitor-in-Chicf of Tower, President M. A. P. 

Efficient in n en ItHU 0) the WOtd. 



Nilah Dee - - Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 

Hypcrians, Y. W. C. A., Science Club, H. E. 
Club 

A girl she seems of cheerful yesterdays, and confident 
tomorrou <. 




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TOWER * 




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Anna B. Forck - - Glen Haven. Wisconsin 

"Ann" 

Hypcrian, Y. W. C, A., H. E. Club 

Sober, but not terhutj 

Quiet, but not idtf. 

Julian N. Johnson - - Wilson, Wisconsin 

"7V\" 

Tower Staff, Football, Stoutonia, Stout Lutheran 

Association 

The man h/'o tills ut bou — "Ban Claire Special" 



F. C. Klippel - - St. Paul, Nebraska 

"Klip 1 ' 

Stout Rifle Club 

A stitJi'tni, quiet, experienced man. 



GERTRUDE H. JoHANN - Sheboygan, Wisconsin 
Y. W. C. A., Science Club 
mnkei the dullest taik interest 



I i n u B. Knutson - - Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Science Club 

To (i unman silence K" ri ber proper grace. 



Herbert C. Kolkind - Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 

Stout Rifle Club 
A Norwegian ami proud of it. 



Arthur |. Movers - Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 
"Arf 
Stoutonia Staff. Pep Committee, Student Manager 
Athletics, Stout Rifle Club 

Hi', friends are both in and out of Stout. 



Reka F. Lembkf - - Ravmond, Minnesota 

"Ret" I 

S. 5. A., Y. W. C. A., H. F. Club, Philomathean 
Demure m eppeerenct and self-reliant in action. 




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T O W E R y 




Dorothv LEONARD - - Windsor, Wisconsin 

"Dottie" 

Philomathean, H. E. Club, Tower Stiff 
Perseverance ran accomplish tnyti 



John O'CONNOR 



'Irish' 



DeSniet, South Dakota 



Marquettc-LaSallc 

Active doer, strong to Ubor, um- to conquer. 



Li sun I.oomi k 



Whitewater, Wisconsin 



'/,.'• 



Glee Club, Band, Quartette, Rifle Club, Football, 
M, \. P. 

An ell-round ■•tit-lent ami good fellow. 



Gkaci McGrigor - - Maplcton, Wisconsin 

"Mick" 

Philo.nathcan, H. K. Club, Y. W. C. A. 
A girl uith a purpose, 



Marcueriti Bostuck Long - Jancsvilc, Wisconsin 

Science Club, Y. W. C. A., H. E. Club 

A good student, a good worker, a good friend. 

Richard Radre - - Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

"Padd | "" 
Trowel Club, Basket-ball, Football, Freshman 
Coach 

TU idol of the Freshman Sqtui. 



Giorce H, Richards - - Ironwood, Michigan 

"Pudgjt" 

Glee Club, Band, M. A. P., Rifle Club 

1 use parable fro >u I.\n H no d. 



Lillian- Miller - - Fennimore, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C. A., H. E. Club 

fin things are impossible to diligence and skill- 



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=1 T h e TOWER! 




Gladys I. Pbnn - - - Mauawa, Wisconsin 

"Penny" 

Arcme, H. E. Club 
Experience lend* bet power. 

I ,ii i.i v. i C. Tki VBI k - Mineral Point, Wisconsin 

"Gib" 

Metallurgy, Y. M. C. A., Tower Staff 

A nun we rati depend on. 



STANLEY TaMYNSKI - - Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Rifle Club, Marquctte-LaSallc, Y, M. C. A. 
An optimist uho'll fight to Kite 
The truth an honest chance to In f. 



i if Rossli k - Mcnomome, Wisconsin 

Mj^rjj" 
Science Club, H. E. Club, S. M. A. 
Tbt force of tier on n merit makes her way. 

Dorothy Si im ... Edgar, Wisconsin 

Dot" 

H. E. Club. Philonmnean 

She is ill! that sin- teem to be. 



Francis R. VsnAmin - Bloomer, Wisconsin 

"Van'' 

Glee Club, S. T. S. 

Silently he follows bin stndimn iui, 



Virva M. Ti.mple - - Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Science Club. H. E. Club, Y, W. C A., Inky 
Fingers 

We see in her diligence, ■' cerleinty of success. 



I si m Sokomk - - LiCrossc. Vijconria 
"Sok" 

S. M. A.. Y. W. C. A. 

arid uas made to be enj<r\eJ and I'll make tbt 
most of it. 




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IThe TOWER* 




Hi nrv T. Ross - DcSoia, Minnesota 

"Hank" 

Metallurgy 

A fair exterior is a silent recommendation. 

\\ m ToRPr - Manitowoc, Wisconsin 

"Torf 

Marqucttc-LaSallc, H. E, Club, Tower Staff 

Peppy, pretty, prudent. 



Cora Sunde - Lanesboro, Minnesota 

l'rt'iident Hyperians, H. E. Club, Y. W. C. A., 
Lutheran Students Association 

She hates to speak ttmntcwy uord<. 



Iluiiiv C. \\"\msii;y - - Lancaster, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club, Marquette-LaSalle 

Dutiful, dignified, diligent. 



Harry E. Watlrs - - Eau Claire, Wisconsin 
"Ocean H2O" 

Band, Rifle Club 
The man with practical rxptrience. 



Gladys H. Vateh - - Withee, Wisconsin 

"Vafc" 

Y. W. C. A., Stoutonia Staff, H. E. Club 

W'c tea Iter eier busy, always hurrying. 



I 1 mi 1 J. WiBB - - - Waukegan, Illinois 

President R E. Club, Areme 

A vision of conscientious thorongbttetf. 



= Guy R. Young 



- - Elmwqod, Wisconsin 
"Gri/rhom" 
Y. M. C. A. 
The hook M3 




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Avis Wilulnradt - - Woncwoc, Wisconsin 

Science Club, H. E. Club, W. A. A. 
She laughs at life, and why not} 



I si in r S, Wolla - - Rice Luke, Wisconsin 

Science Club, Tower Staff, H. E. Club, Hy- 
perians 

h'ft er forward in anything but bet duty, and always 



Seniors Whose Pictures Do Not Appear 
ErrwAW> Amos 
A. R. Trinko 
G. Bavsint.fr 





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OUR PLEDGE 

Alma Mater < an, again we come to thee; 
Though records few we bring, and few may claim, 
We ever would thy loyal children be. 
And in proud tcast again would praise thy name. 

A most unworthy son indeed is he 
Who in thy hails his earlier years would spend, 
And then forget the debt he owes to thee, 
Or, thankless, fail in praise his voice to lend. 

New hcm.s. new forms and faces we shall rind. 
In distant clitr.es we may our work pursue. 
But fast within our memories we shall bind 
The lessens dear which we have learned from you, 

S;> Mother ours — our Friend, our Guide, in one — 
With heart-accented thoughts we leave with thee 
This meagre record of the things we've done, 
I his earnest pledge of lasting loyalty. 

W. B. D. 









Pag* it 









<A 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 



FTER three years of seeking, striving, and achieving, we, the Junior class 
of Stout, pause a moment in our busy school career to glance back upon the 
various vicissitudes of the years spent together in fellowship and work. 

Attainments not alone in scholastic, but along athletic lines as well, 
have earned merited recognition. The roster of our class membership contains many 
names prominent in various school activities, while to the Junior class goes credit for 
the outstanding social event of the year, the Junior All-School Prom, the success of 
which bespeaks the versatility of our members. 

Distinctive among all other classes, as three year students of The Stout Institute, 
we have striven always to uphold the old traditions and high ideals of our beloved 
Alma Mater. 



Roi I \N!> Xokkis 

Henry Ross 
Margaret Blair 
Dan Chambi ki in 
Sally Makiin 



President 
Vice-President 

Secrctar) 

Treasurer 

Assist an t Treasurer 




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I .. V. AllONI N 






- Chisholm, Minnesota 



Stoutonia. Y. M. C A.. M. A. P.. S. T. S. 
Blessed will) a deep sense of humor, be enjoys life. 

Arbutus Anderson - - Bcloit, Wisconsin 

"Arty 

Y. V. C. A.. S. M. A. 

The essence of unobtrusiie sociability. 



Luflla Anderson 



- Clear lake, Wisconsin 






Y. W. C A., W. A. A.. Inky Fingers 

Xatnic made her u hit it should. 
Not too bad and not too Rood. 

Hi nry V. ANDERSON - Ironwood. Michigan 

"Andy " 

S. T. S.. Football 

He btt an ilcfihjutu- sense of humor. 



Norman Brooks - - Willnur, Minnesota 

"Brooks" 

M. A. P. 

In spite of his modesty ue hate found him out — a 

brilliant man, a deligbftul companion. 

\imin - - Janesvillc, Wisconsin 

"Flo 

O. 1. Club. Y. W. C. A. 
Seen often, but seldom Iteard. 



LENA Bertodotto - - Chisholm, Minnesota 

:j" 

Marqucttc-LaSallc. H. E. Club, Inky Fingers 
Beneath her quietness lies true sincerity. 

Leslie W. Bro» n - - Republic, Michigan 
/ like uork; it fascinates me. 



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TOWER 




it Blair - - Ashland, Wisconsin 

"\hi%i" 
\Y. A. A., Y. W. C. A., Philomatliean 
May the rcuarj of haunt toil be yours. 

Charles BusvelX - - Kendalls, Wisconsin 

"MziT 

Hiil>p\-Ko-ltH~ky, I Li*" /"«.■ Hotbrng there is that 
bothers rnc. 



Cliuord C Carlson - - Aurora, Minnesota 

"Cliff" 

Band, S. T. S„ Football 

My ideas are larger than my words. 

Hisrii ir.\ BHAKER - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

"Hanlr 
S. M. A., W. A. A , Y W. C A., M. A. P., 
Tower Staff 

She has that eombituHon rarely found, 
PraclHul gbiltty ciiul artistic skill. 



Ci ara K. Carl.sen - - Grantsburg, Wisconsin 

Philomathean, V. W. C. A., W. A. A. 

Tij the wise bead thai makes the itill tongue. 

Donald B. Cole - - Evansvillc, Wisconsin 

"Dun" 
Y. M. C. A., Metallurgy, Rifle Club 
There ain't no lUt in all thil hrtrryin' pell- 
through life. 



MICHAEL W. Cvenoros - Iroirwood, Michigan 

"Af ;■ 
Student Advisory Board, Football, Baskct-Ball, 
Marquette-LaSillc 

We tatOM Vfby he no hat does near; 

'7m to show off his curly btlf. 

Hi i . i :\ xni i n Cushman - Evansvillc, Wisconsin 
"Cushy " 
M. A. P. 
Life ft a icrknti proposition — so arc men. 




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William L. Brown - I -ike 1 inJen, Michigan 

"Broun" 

One of the old regime. 

J-li/.mii in Hon Dfwar - Lewiwillc, Minnesota 

Y. W. C. A. 

What it the hurry? If I don't come today, I'll come 

tnmorrnu . 



Anna de Yong - - KaLispcll, Montana 

". ituu dt" 

Y. W, C. A., Hjrperiam, H. E. Club 

fbt goal of human strife h peace. She has it. 

(•Kin I. DECKER ■ - Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

"Deck" 

Football, Basket-Bali 

The UCrti of success is constancy of purpose. 



Ed. Dobli K - - ■ Great Falls, Montana 

"Eddie" 

lie could aluays add a uord about the needed 

information. 

Rubv M, Ekman - - Bessemer, Michigan 

"Riiben\" 

Y. W. C. A., Areme 

Her wtyi itre ujys of pleasantness. 



Mary Lu Endrjzzi - - Hurley, Wisconsin 

"Breezy" 
Marquette I aSalle, M. A. P., Scoutonia, Hyper- 
ians. W. A. A. 

As merry as the day is Unix. 

I.i w rs T. Erchul - - Gilbert, Minue-i.ti 

"Kellv' 

S. T, S., Football 

There is no inch folly as being in loir. 




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I si hir M. GitENzow - Montkcllo, Wisconsin 

Hypcrians, Y. W. C. A, 

She attain', the ultimate in all her endeavors, 

Gib. \ii) Ffrdon - - Antigo, Wisconsin 

"jerry" 

Y. M. C. A., Rifle Club, Metallurgy, Football 

Aluays ready with an ttttWtT. 



Victor F. Glenn - - LaFarge, Wisconsin 

"Vic" 

Stout Band. Y. M. C. A. 

Tht unattached. 

Vfra HuNZiKfR - - Wausaw, Wisconsin 

I'm busy n w. 



L.UCJLF HaGLKIY 



'Luke 1 



Knapp, Wisconsin 



S. S. A. Vice-President; M. A. P., S. M. A., 
Student Advisory Board. 

As a friend she h as true as the \iin. 

Hi mh |. list in k - - Jefferson, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club, Trowel Club 

Rip Van Winkle's only rival. 



Miron B. Goodvin - - Kenosha, Wisconsin 

"Mamie" 

Y. M. C. A., Stout Rifle Club 

A steadfast purpose spun him on to his goal. 

Jlanette Jackson - Brainerd, Minnesota 

"Jackie" 

Y. W. C. A., W. A. A., Philomathean 

The fairest garden was in her looks, 

And in her mind the wisest books. 




Pate 38 




tThe TOWER ic- 



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Max*i ii. Gundlach - Livinpton, Vbconiin 

"Mark" 

Band, Rifle Club, M. A. P. 

B/i-i/.A return with pteaure. 

Margarit Johnson - - Iowa Fills, Iowa 

"I': j 

The kind of a girl that gives and recehm true 
frlenJtbip. 



Elizabeth L. Jenkins - Sheboygan, Wisconsin 

H. E. Club, Y. W. C. A., Philomathcan 

Quiet and unassuming. 

Floyd Burgess - - Beaver Dim, Wisconsin 

"Slim" 
Metallurgy 
tm dignified, but w*ii tilt yon know him. 



Frank X, Guyott - - McKinUf, Minnesota 

"Punk" 

Hockey 

/ Jo profess to be no less than I seem. 

Mary R. Kaschak - - Goodman, Wisconsin 

MarquMce-USalle. H. E. Club, W. A. A. 

"None knew thee hut to lair thee; 

None named (bet but to praise." 



|i aa B. Larson 



lYw.iukec, Wisconsin 



•Jess" 



Y. W. C. A., W. A. A., H. E. Club, Philomathcan 
Sueet bird th<>t tbinr'st the noise of folly. 

Fviritt Harris - - Elmuood, Wisconsin 

"Bu<i\" 

S. T. S., Y. M. C. A. 

Tiny, trim, and tnuty. 




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Almst M. HeLGUON - Woodville, Wisconsin 

"Heine" 

Rifle Club, Y. M. C. A. 

Hi gtzid, ■'•■• rtidened tike a row. 

Blushing is bis weakness, as everyone MOWS. 

Margaret Larson - - Rice Lake, Wisconsin 

Hyperians, Y. W. C. A. 

We arc in the culm and proud possession of external 

things. 



PEAM Ll.snwi - - St. Paul. Minnesota 

Y. W. C. A. 

Spetcb is great, but silence is greater. 




Josuph C. Tndihar 



Gilbert, Minnesota 



'joe' 



Marquettc-LaSallc, Woodworkers, S. T. S. 
He utyi what be tbhtki and be usually thinks right. 



W.w tfr II. Jlskf - - Zumbrota, Minnesota 

"Spike" 

Football, S. T. S. 

Owe of Cupid's I ittims. 

Phyllis B. Linn - - Ishpcming, Michigan 

"P hilly" 
Areme, Y. W. C. A. 

"Pluilx" — F.i crybody's friend. 



Sai.lv Martin - - Pond Ju Lac, Wisconsin 

"Sail?* 

W. A. A., S. M. A„ Tower Staff 

I would jiiit « toon act it out for you, because ac- 

tit)>r\ speak louder than uords. 

Irving Johnson - - Whitewater, Wisconsin 

"In " 

Rifle Club, Y. M. C, A. 

I ask a blttlittg on him icbo invented sleep. 




{ 



Page 40 



r- < m in ^ S- . t m 





r h 



TOWER tz 



VmoES F. Kamn - - Livingston, Wisconsin 

"Katun" 

S, T. S., Stoutonia, Y. M. C. A. 

ffi- Ineth in the realm of thought, beyond the world 

of things. 

Olga Nt'Rvin - Palmer, Minnesota 

A winsome and an earnest Itst h toe. 



Helen Roth - - Chiiholm, Mini 

' i ,! 

Hypcrun Treasurer, H. I.. Club 
Her pretence assures success. 

1,1 i - Black River Falls, Wisconsin 

*7.iirs" 
S. T. S. 
He appears as quiet a< a mouse, until you knnu him. 



William [ohnsotj - McKinlcy, Minnesota 

S. T. S. 
Argllt, argue, early and late; 
If a line were crooked, he'd argue it straight. 



Mil OKI n Olson - - - Baldwin, Wisconsin 

'■\\rllx- 

Y. W. C. A.. Girls' Glee Club 

Sot h never too busy to be friendly. 



MABEL Sandvig - - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Student Association, Y. W. C. A. 

A hard worker; she deserves to win. 

Emmett R. Muhfhi - - Buhl, Minnesota 

" Win filt" 

Marquette- La Salic 

Quiet men are at times mint surprising. 



■y$i* 



IftaKc 




Page p 



5t The TOWERS 





Roi LAND W. Morris - West Salem, Wisconsin 

Y. M. C. A.. Stoutonia Staff, S. T. S., Band, 
Pep-Committee 

I am run/en/ uith ivhat U sufficient. 

EMMA SoQGI - -. Two Rivers, Wisconsin 

**Soggf 

She h a $ooJ scout; we all like her. 



Ci \k\ S< HOI NOl i - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

H. E. Club, S. M. A., Y. W. C. A., Tower Staff 
Her thought! m deeper than all speeih. 

Allan R. Murray - - Pepin, Wisconsin 

"Al" 

Stout Rifle Club, Metallurgy 

He has no time for ghh or fame; 

A good i-iiui athin is his only aim. 



|nM\ Nun iiuri - - St. Paul, Minnesota 

"Jack" 

Ba$kct-Ball, Football, Marquctic-LaSalle 

Real worth requires WO interpreter. 



Ill i.t n Stit/ir - - - Sparta, Wisconsin 

"Helle" 
M. A. P. 
A nirl with rtd 6*Jr will hate red hair till she iytt. 



EuiGAKD Schwartz: - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

"Irmie" 
W. A. A„ Marquette-I.aSalle, Philomathcan 
She is well started on the reiail to sn, 

Clarence O'Briln - - Marenisco, Michigan 

Marquettc-LaSallc 

When 1 get started I go. hut it takes a lot to get me 

started. 



t 






( 




Page 4J 




:nThe TOWER J 






Mary O. Tomsic - - Goodman, Wisconsin 

"Tommy" 
H. £. Club, M. A. P.. Tower Staff, Marquette- 
LaSalle 

A smile it the \avit in all languages. 

LEONARD F. Pavlicm - 1 lurley, Wisconsin 

"Bay" 

M.irquettc-LaSallc 

/ like to haic them fall for me ami leaie them uhere 

fh n foil. 



Philip Oi son 



"Phil' 
Band 



Chisholm, Minnesota 



Life is \ust one goad thing after another. 

ORPIIA Stevens - - Portland, Oregon 

Sioutonia Staff, H. E. Club 

Clever, popular, tnd above all dependable. 



Aucr. G. Tkorsen - - Ashland. Wisconsin 

"All,,- 

W, A. A., Y. W. C. A., H. E. Club 

There h nothing in lift « pleasant by half, as a 

pleasant girl iritli a merry laugh. 

Martin On If Zumbrota, Minnesota 

"Marty" 

Y. M. C. A.. Football, Basket-Bill 
A good fellow among fellows. 



Norman A. Olson - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Tow" 

Stoutnnia, Tnwcr, Glee Club, M. A. P., S. T. S. 
Quartette 
Then is an atmosphere of happiness about that man. 

William Peterson - - Superior, Wisconsin 

"Pete" 

Metallurgy, Football, Basket-Ball, Baseball 

A good athlete; a good student; a good scout. 





Page u 




The TOWERT 




V 




Marian C. White - - Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Marquette-l.aSalle, H. E. Club 
A Nash, a Buick, a Font, or a Star, 
Marian has faith in every car. 

John D. Slaybaugh - Medomonie, Wisconsin 

"facf 

S. T. S. 

Let the world go as it may; 

i'll take it any way. 



Wm.ti-r A. Spi KRSTRA - - Osseo, Wisconsin 

rri" 

Tower Business Manager, Stoutonia, S. T. S. 
// unit ui /bit* tht thought* in his mind. 

Nina Van Houtk.v - - Berlin, Wisconsin 

"Kin," 

Tower, M. A. P., Y. W. C. A., Philomathcan 

Til miiit' better In be small ami shine, 

m to be large and cast a shadow. 



Fk xni-.i s Vi kkikki - - Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

W. A. A., M. A. P., S. M. A., Science Club 

Come and /r;/> // ,ir yrin go, 
On the tight fantastic toe. 

HaxOLO Riim'i - - Zumbrnia, Minnesota 

"Rcl>" 

Glee Club, S. T, S-, Cheerleader 

Hi is Sit net all by himself. 



ili mn kt Ritzman - - Superior, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy, Rifle Club 

/ may Jo something sensational yet. 

Wmirid Rost ... Gilbert, Minnesota 
"Rosie" 
Band, Glee Club, V. \L C. A., S. T. S„ Rifle 
Club 

\\~, would Mi tunc him off- 




Pflfi u 




=St T h e TOWERI 






. 



i 



Ray A, Vjrni.r - - Muscatine, Iowa 

"Rar" 
Rifle Club, M. A. P., Y. M. C. A. 

An ,itl-ruiintl man am! a matt all aruuml. 

MiiviN S»imh - - Menomonie. Wisconsin 

"Hani" 

Tower Staff 

Men ./., known b} tht company they ktep. 
Ham h a top-rurtchcr. 



Jlhry Vojta - Rice Lake, Wisconsin 

"firry" 

Uis tyes were open, but he urns found nlttp. 



JUNIORS 
WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 



B. Banks 
C. Bmk 

D. Chambj hi iv 

T. GjERDL" 

F. Gri i i iv 

1. Hwvik«>\ 

I. Hanki 

V. Hoi i i hi 

K. Hosted 

G. Jackson 
A. K.UBE 

C. Lanki 
M. O'Brii n 

G. San in' it. 

H. Watlrs 

E. Zimmerman 





Page 15 



1 T h 



i 





n 









Sally M uittx 
Prom 



Ray Wimii 
Prom King 



I 



THE SECOND ANNUAL JUNIOR PROM 

f/^ ■ ' HE Second Annual Junior Prom, held on Saturday evening. April twenty- 
I J first, was attended by a record number of students and guests, who danced 
*kr to the music cf "Cec" Hurst's Jazz Orchestra. 

Colorful decorations developed in the school blue and white, were cen- 
tered ab;:ut the motif of the new school emblem. 

THE COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Haroi i) Rippe .... Entertainment 
Norman Brooks .... Decoration 

Sally Martin Finance 

Frank Guyott Program 

Roland Norris - ... Reception 
Nina VanHouten .... Refreshments 
Norman Olson Pnhlicity 









■ 



PATRONS WD PATRONESSES 

President and Mrs. B. E. Nelson. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bowman 
Miss Michaels 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Davison 



( II API- RONES 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Paulus 
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Milnes 
Miss Littlcjohn 
Miss Callahan 



vi/ 






— ^1 




..-^y.V >-■•■* ••• — 





<F 



THE SOPHOMORK CLASS 

HE Sophomore Class, the first class to enter The Stout Institute on the strictly 
four-year basis, counted, in the fall of \92j, an enrollment of eighty-two 
members. 



i 



As members of this class, we have made the attempt to prove our worth 
to the school and to respect the standards she has set for us. In scholarship, social 
events, athletics, and organizations, we pass the tests well, and in every case, true 
school spirit with belief in the work is found to predominate in our ranks. We 
have two more years to prove of greater value to Stout, two more years to bind to- 
gether a firm class fellowship which will be not only a credit to ourselves but to our 
Alma Mater. We have tried to till successfully the places vacated for us and as we 
i, we look with anticipation to the years before us. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



Lawrence Johnson 

EsTHI K SlUIIlK 

\ \I>! I N CUSHMAN 
Ron; R i Tin n ER 
Miss Ji n R wi> Mr. Good 



Pr«i 
Vice-Prt 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Faculty Advisors 







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i.. .1 

I. Hamhlty 

T. Kmcrson 

: -se 
*'•■ Mrrduti 



K. Dike 
M. Dingee 
II. Kennon 
I. Citric 



■ 

A. Winter 
N. Winn 



!». Harris 
T. Andcr«on 




Dinger 
G. Filoor 

!<rrich 

untell 

S. Knit 






■ 



















C. Brown 

K. William* 
11. Si< 

nfeldl 

T. Scliaffncr 



II 


L. I..'. 




Halve raon 


■ 


R 


Theiler 


A. 




E. 


Sichler 


C"». John ton 


\l 


Kleilcr 


B. 




11 


Silviua 






Page 


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HeMb 


A. 


[vcraon 




1 


Cadigan 


I-. 




E. 


Patrick 


innon 


«>. 


Padotti 












Pag t y> 







E. Moc 
W. Winger 



SOPHOMORES WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 



B. BftONSI ID 


R. Kimi v 


M. Cam v 


M. Mn i ar 


HRY 


R. Mn i i k 


1. DOYL1 


1 . Nil M>S 


i). Evans 


II. R \S\U SM N 


M. Foi 


H. W'oi FGRAM 


0. Hagi n 


II. V 


L. Hanson 








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FRESHME 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 













EPTEMBER sixth saw the enrollment at The Stout Institute of a body of 
Freshman students larger in number than the class of last year. 

For us, the first week or two of school passed in a general state of be- 
wilderment. New friends, new teachers, unfamiliar subjects, and still more 
unfamiliar rules .ind regulations filled our lives. Would it be presuming to say that we 
learned more out of the class room than we did in it during the beginning week? Some 
things we learned through our own experiences, and some were taught by upper class- 
men who were, at times, stern schoolmasters. Although acting in self-defense, we man- 
aged very well and came through the first confusing weeks and the entire initiation 
period with colors flying. 

By the time initiation was over we had made the necessary adjustments in our altered 
modes of living. We had formed many friendships in our own class and in the ranks 
of the upper classes, and were beginning to feel as if we were truly a part of the school. 
Freshmen have responded to practically all extra-curricular activities, and our repre- 
sentation in athletics, dramatics, music, and club work is one in which we may be 
justly proud. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



John W. Barbi r 
Ernest Christi Nson 
Lucian Paulus 
Ernest Muller - 



President 

Y u e-President 

Secretary 

- Treasurer 















/'«*:«• $4 









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Kuktr ^ ^^ F, >chroedcr I.. Gardiner 

• \v,;u w. H M. G 

R. Prater M. XccrgaaM <i. I- 

I). Moldenhaucr M. Kcc»c II. K"*-. 

I. Runker J. Xothan E. Ovcrby 



M. Oamton 

II. lUumhach 

A. A: 

(". K- 

\V. K I 



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ibler 
( . Welts 

l\. Atnlernon 
\\. Hints 
Icerill 



S. Cotton l>. Bruhn K. Ki^ts* 

a Hassemer K. Matt son I ". Hill 

M. McCullough t llablci I . Beck 

C. Brick M. Lathan D. William* 

E. Christenacn K. Lindquist \. I' 



L. Miter 

P. Zimmerman 

M. II 

\l. \ nkelicli 

A. Haslcrud 




















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M. DrCramer 

::cr 

M. All 



D. Fcircr 

.1. Dodge 

V. 1' 

■'• 

K. Dooley 



R, Bottuener 
I. Edingcr 
o. Knli 
W. Arnold 

menuon 



H. K 
J. Barber 

A. Mi 
I.. Vrcvland 
'.cock 




•chert 



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P*t< 57 



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ld\ II. i hulling I.. Stuter 

R. Ilusby \. KriiK 

l»on \. Tones K. Pi 

lor I.. .1. II. Hunker 

i . McClurg 1". Wcincr 



ok sp K. Worachck 

B. Hagcn © K. 

- 
-%_jk Hewitt 
hold VT> R. Kess 




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Georgia Ober 


M. Scntjr B. Brickcr M. Winters K. W. Btri 




Specials 


A. I 


V. Rccdcr H. Hawkins 


M 


J. Lanckton D. 1 ivecotte K. Cairdli 




FRESHMEN WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 




1 . Am.i mom M. Johxiow 




0. AND! RSON O. Jci.in 




1 .. Ai'i'Pii BY T. JUNC4 k 




R. Bircir 1 • K\Ki \K 




M. Decker M. Kikk.n 




K. 1 NOLESBY R- KoCL 




R. Favor 1 I arson 




A. Fii \n H. M. Larson 




A. Goodrich F. Mann 




D. Grm n J. Rude 




J. Ham i v L. Schmitt 




F. KlNIILDT L. VC'aDI. 



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Page 60 



< 






THE STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

^^^^* HE Stout Student Association, as the major student organization at Stout, 
I "^ has ever striven to help in making a bigger and better Stout by co-operation 
ir^ with the administration. Through the school year of 192--2S the S. S. A. 
has endeavored to fulfill the purposes set forth for this body by carrying 
out the duties delegated by the constitution. These duties were discharged by the four 
officers, as elected by the association members: namely, the secretary and treasurer, who 
were elected in the spring of 1927. an< ^ tnc president and vice-president, who were 
elected during the second week of school in the fall term. 

The major purposes of the organization are fourfold: to provide a smoothness in 
discharge of student activities through scheduling all school and social events on both a 
weekly and a yearly calendar; to distribute to the Band. Men's Glee Club, Girls' Glee 
Club. Manual Arts Players, Athletics, Lyceum, Stoutonia, and S. S. A., the money re- 
ceived at registration time as an activity fee; to issue to the members of the S. S. A. 
the master tickets which give admittance to entertainments sponsored by the above 
organizations; and to organize plans for Homecoming and Commencement. 

Any student, faculty member, or member of the office staff, with his immediate 
family, may become a member of the association by paying the activity fee of four dol- 
lars per semester. 

During the year, the association contributed to the social life by giving several 
dances for the entire student body. The dances, mixer in nature, were always well at- 
tended and greatly enjoyed. 

This is an organization representative of the students in that its activities are 
planned and carried out by them. Each day from 4:15 to 5 o'clock a student is in 
charge of the S. S. A. desk to transact the business which may arise. 

The employment bureau, which was formerly under charge of this student organ- 

on, was relegated to the Y. W. C. A. and the V. M. C. A. These two organizations 
handle the business of getting jobs for students desirous of doing part-time work, where- 
as the S. S. A. desk is used merely as .1 medium for appointments. 

Homecoming of this year, 1927, was celebrated on November 4 and 5. The S. S. A. 
officers in charge of the event laid plans and distributed the work to various committees 
and organizations. The 1927 Homecoming was pronounced the biggest success at the 
school in many years. 

It is in all sincerity that the S. S. A. officers wish to express their gratitude to the 
faculty and to the student body for their splendid support and co-operation in carrying 
cut the Association program. 









Pagt 6.- 
















VlT. 







102T-28 








■ 


















Pag* ■■ 












HOMECOMING 

~Y^\ EG1NNING with "The Show Off," and followed by the bonfire, owl pep 

j"^ session, and shirt-tail parade. Stout opened wide its spirit and started one of 

vL^/ the largest and most successful homecomings ever seen on the Stout campus. 

The night-shirt parade, after winding its way up Wilson Avenue and 
down Main Street, paraded to the bonfire with jubilant enthusiasm; there the cos- 
tumes were judged and the mock marriage took place. With the bonfire as a setting, 
the colorful wedding of the Frosh President and the Soph Vice-President took place. 
Prizes awarded for costumes went to Irma Nichols for the best dressed girl, Sidney 
Cotton for the best dressed man, and Harold Taufman for the funniest dressed man. 

With a setting of "Welcome" flags and decorated windows, the parade, with its 
gayly colored floats, was a unique sight. In the morning, a very successful and rous- 
ing assembly put everyone in an enthusiastic mocd for the afternoon game. 

Between halves of the game, a delegation of Freshman boys, attired in almost every 
finable kind of wearing apparel, gathered on the field to give an example of their 
idea of how to play football. The antics of these fellows brought many loud laughs 
from the crowd and soon had most of them forgetting their red noses and cold feet. 
The Pathe News also had a representative on the field who shot the crowd from all 
angles; he claims he has some very good action pictures of the team. One student 
doubts our ever seeing them in any but the largest theaters. 

The students were at the game one hundred per cent, and were accompanied by 
many local supporters of the school. There was also a large delegation who came from 
Fau Claire to see the game. Everyone sat in the grandstand; thus people were grouped 
together and the cheer leaders brought forth many thunderous cheers for the team. 

The banquet in the evening was carried out in letter style and was well attended. 
The next big event of the day was the dance in the Gym. An unusually large crowd 
attended this last all-school feature. The dimmed lights and the cleverly arranged 
blue and white decorations, coupled with Benny's snappy band, all made the dance a real 
celebration after the afternoon's victory over Eau Claire. 

The large number of alumni with us made our Homecoming complete. Four wo- 
men represented the first graduation classes of The Stout Institute. They were: Miss 
Ruth Michaels, Mrs. Pearl Bailey Lyons, Miss Nellie Farnsworth, and Miss Hatty Dahl- 
bcrg. The rest of the alumni were graduates of the last two or three years. One man 
travelled four hundred miles to attend; his trip no doubt makes the record for mileage. 

In all, we deem our Homecoming one of the largest and most successful ever 
seen on the Stout campus, this assumption being based on the enthusiastic reports from 
both alumni and students. 



A 



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/ 






Pate 64 






i e TOWERS 































1 T h 









i 



/ 



STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION ADVISORY BOARD 

f i 1 VF.RY well organized college has an efficient student government, eliminating 
f « waste in Student funds, energies, and possibilities. Since Stout is now well 
^■"^ organized on the four-year basis, more and more of the student regulation is 
being delegated to the student body. In the fall of 1927 the Student Coun- 
cil, which had been appointed the previous year, was supplanted by the Stout Student 
Advisory Board. This board consists of the four regularly elected officers of the Stout 
Student Association and one man and one woman elected by each of the four classes, 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior. The board is an official arm of the S. S. A. 
and also represents the students through their class organizations. The president of the 
Stout Student Association is cx-officio president of the Student Advisory Board. 

With the sanction of the administrative officers of the college, the Board acts in 
all matters pertaining to student life and interests; it is also a standing committee on 
the rules of the S. S. A. A member of the Board acts as chairman of the committee 
governing the election of S. S. A. officers. 

In carrying out its work, the Advisory Board acts in conference and co-operation 
with the Faculty Committee on College Organization. This committee consists of the 
Director of the School of Industrial Arts, the Director of the School of Household 
Arts, and four members of the faculty chosen by the President of the College. 







Page 66 






s 










L. Saute r -31 M. White -29 ©. Williams -31 L. Lootntr-'28 
















r h 



TOWER 






^S 



1 



THE STOUTONIA 

f^^^ m ^WE STOUTOXIA, weekly newspaper of the Stout campus, enjoys the unique 
■ I "^ distinction of being one of the very tew college papers in the country both 
^J^ published and printed by students. 

Three years ago The Stoutonia assumed the more definite characteristics 
of a newspaper. Each year it has changed its style of make-up and added new editorial 
features. It is still far, however, from the goal it hopes to attain after Stout has em- 
phasized academic training for a few years. It is hoped that, from now on. ambitious 
writers may acquire here a more definite training for publications work. 

In the range of news carried, and in the completeness and timeliness of its stories, 
the paper has progressed during each year. Indicative of the increased importance of the 
college paper in campus activities, the members of the staff have shown developing in- 
terest in the improvement of their work. More than ever, they count their Stoutonia 
work a privilege and an honor, and feel that they have gained not only experience in 
writing for print but have also held a responsibility which, in building character, has 
aided them to a degree which few other campus activities could have equalled. 



STOUTONIA EDITORIAL STAFF 



John Fa villi , Jr. 
Gerald Lund 
Orpha St i \ i \s 
Gladys Vater 
Mary Lu Endrizzi 
Arthur Mow i rs 

Francis Yirmrki 
John I.an< k u>\ 

al polllinger 
Norman Olson 

iii \nor a v frill 

F. V. Ahom n 
Llcile Millr 





STAFF 


Adi isor 


Managing Editor 


Associate Editor 


Neu j Editor 


Assistant 


Sports Editor 


tistani 


Feature Editor 


Assistant 


vge Editor 


- Society Editor 


Humor Editor 


Dormitories Editor 






\ 



BUSINESS STAFF 



C. W. Hv 
Walter Speerstra 
Douglas Harris 
Clayton Halverson 
Virden Kamn 
George Mi.rdl tt - 



Adi isor 

Business Manager 

Ad i ertising Manager 

Assistant 

Circulation Manager 

Assistant 






Page 6S 



T h 



> 













s 









KJi 



'■■;•■ -v 



v 






THE STOUT TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 

/"* A MAJOR interest in a major field, the Stout Typographical Society has bc- 
\j \ come a helpful organization for those who are interested in this work. The 
£ J^ men appreciate not only the advantages to be derived from an association 
which offers information and knowledge concerning printing, publishing, and 
problems confronting teachers of printing, but also enjoy the closer co-operation and 
fellowship with the members. 

This organization has grown to include in its membership practically every man 
enrolled in advanced courses in printing. The society is divided into three classes or de- 
grees, namely: Apprentice. Journeyman, and Master. Entrance to each is made through 
a special examination. 

I he meetings are held bi-monthly, on Wednesday evening. Among the members 
are several men who have been successful teachers or workers in the trade, and who 
have willingly given instructive talks to the club on problems which confront the new 
teacher of printing. The outstanding social event in each semester is the initiating of 

members. The organization is also responsible for several school dances each year. 

The club is no longer in the embryo stage but has proved its worth and its popu- 
larity. With the four-year course at Stout, it is now possible for the members to spend 
more time in the club and enjoy a greater fellowship that will be an admirable remem- 
brance of Stout. 

OFFICERS 
First Si-mcsUr Second S<-w, 

President 

Ci imord Carlson - - - \\ M n r Speerstra 

Vh e-President 
Orlando Paciotti - - Henry Am 

Sccrefary-Trtjsin.r 
Roland Norris - - - Douglas Hakkis 



— -V 



' 









Page To 



































Pat* ;i 



3t 






i 







INKY FINGhRs 

f\ t"\ ITHOL'T attempting to create professional writers, it is the aim of Inky 

/ I I lingers to develop the interest and skill of its members. By means of a point 

^^* system their contributions to the club are evaluated. At the end of the year 

a pri/e is awarded to the member ranking big 

Every two weeks a meeting is Held in the Band Box during the dinner hour. A 

Christmas party, a Valentine party, and a spring picnic are delightful traditional events. 
The most interesting meeting of the year, if not in the history of the society, was that 
cf January twelfth, at which Lew Sarett. our Wisconsin poet, was the guest of honor. 
The officers for this school year are: 

Coreni Baysinger Ruling fen 

Iiw BERTADOTTO .... Rubber Sfjinp 

Gertrudi Burt - - fountain Pen and Paper Knife 
Luella Andirsox Index 

Miss Callahan \\;> Miss Sakchet - - Faculty Advisors 
Mr. Davison and Mr. PauLUS - - Honorary Members 












Page 7* 














•orrice-cs - 

Pr*.»lW*»>» .... Vtrr,* Al Temple.. 



- TACULTV AJ7VI50BJ - 
Mist Crvisc 




THE SCIENCE CLUB 

/"A T THE beginning of the first semester of this year a number of the faculty 
^^JL and uppcrclassmcn of The Stout Institute who arc especially interested in 
• «* the various fields of science showed their interest by formally organizing i 
club known as the Science Club. 

The purpose of the Science Club is three-fold: to keep abreast with the scientific 
spirit of the times, to create an interest in the promotion of science, and to broaden 
our vision of the part which science plays in a liberal education. 

Membership in the Science Club is open to men and women, but is limited to fac- 
ulty. Seniors, second semester Juniors, and such others as may be recommended by science 
instructors. 

The officers for this school year are: 

Viiiw Timimi ..... President 

< i \;\ Boland .... Vice-President 

Avis Wildenradt ... Secretary-Treasurer 

Dr. I k i 1 > \ Bachman - - - Faculty Advisor 












Page 73 






I 



STOUT HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

^^^"* HE membership of the Stout Home Economics Club, formed in 1924. is com- 
I | posed of Junior and Senior girls in the school of Household Arts. The pur- 

iir^ poses of the organization as outlined in the constitution are: to better ac- 
quaint girls of the Junior and Senior classes with one another, to provide social 
times, and to secure home economics speakers to address the school. 

Meetings arc held en the first Thursday of every month and arc made up of 
business and social programs. 

The club lias been accepted into the National Home Economics Association, and 
was admitted into the Wisconsin Home Economics Association in 1926 as a student 
club. This year the girls are working hard to make th.- dub a national sorority affiliated 
with other heme economics sororities. 



Ol I IC! RS 



Gracl McGrlgor 
Dorothy Sum 

\!:ss Mi ii \i i s 



President 
- Vice-Prt 

Set . . - 

Faculty Advisor 













' 







' 



w 



©fl&© 





J 

I)onu economic* 






a 



a t'j 



f s § 











THE PHILOMATHEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 






I 



(J\ ■ • HE Philomathcan Literary Society was organized for the purpose of furthering 
I I "^ general culture. The work this year has varied somewhat from previous 
^g^ activities. The girls decided that they would like to take up a study of mod- 
ern American poetry, grand opera, and social etiquette. These subjects 

formed the basis of the programs held at the meetings. 



/ 



This year the Philomatheans, with the Hyperians and the S. M. A., decided to take 
in their new members by means of rushing and pledging, rather than by the method 
formerly used. This change has resulted in increased interest and pleasure, both for 
the pledges and for the old members. 



01 I ICERS 



Grace McGri <.ok 
Margaret Blair 
Alice Thorsen 
Jessie Larson 
Miss Little johx 
Mrs. Pali. W'ii son 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

- Faculty Advisor 

[ssch /.</«• Adt isor 






MEMBERS 



nina van iioiti n 
ii annette ja< kson 
grace McGregor 

Kl K,\ II MBKE 
ALICE THOKM N 
[RMGARD SCHWARTZ 



MARCARI T HI AIR 
( I \R.\ ( \K!M N 
DOROTHY SEIM 
JESSII LARSON 

DOROTHY LEONARD 
I I l/ARI III II NKINS 






CHARLOTTE Vi AI( HORN 
MARGARET JOHNSON 
ALICE HAZII RLD 
ALMA wTNZER 



S--1 



PLEDGES 

MARY K\S( IIAK 
RUTH MALCOLM 
CLARA BOI AND 
I I \ A PAGE 



RUBY I KM AN 
EDITH BRI\I>. 
HELEN STETZ1 R 
RUTH BOSMI \l R 







J'age ;6 



t T h e TOW 







T T h 






THE HYPERIAN SOCIETY 



f^^^^HE Hypcrian Society, which aims to study some of the problems of social 
I J welfare work. i\ interested in local projects. Not only has the society con- 
sT > ^ tinued to care for its adopted daughter, but it has also shown its interest in 
the needy children of the community. The annual Christmas party for 
needy children, sponsored by the organization, contributed much to the enjoyment of 
both the girls and the children. 

A literary and social program is planned for the bi-monthly meetings. At the 
annual breakfast at Homecoming, the Alumnae, who have been loyal in their support 
of the active members, may meet the new members, and renew their acquaintance and 
interests in the work of the local group. 



OI I K I RS 



Aw 

Lillian Hylland 

Cora Sundi 

1 1 1 i i x Roth 

Miss Vasold - 

MRS. W. B. Davison 



President 
- Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Faculty Advisor 

Associate Aili isor 



MARY LU I.NDR1ZZI 
i -v i s 1 1 K GR1 \/o\v 
WW dc YOUNG 
HI I IN BUNK! K 
\l I I)\ K \ss|\II R 
III ARIETTA QUI I I IN(. 
ELIZABETH DOOl I Y 
MARGARET LARSON 
III NKIi I I.\ si I. VERT 



MEMBERS 

ARDI II a ANDERSON 
wTNIFRED COOPl K 
ALICE MARQUART 
ESTHER WOLLA 
KATHRYN COUNS1 I l 
ANNA PORCK 
CORA SUN Dl 
MARY GR1 I N 
Mil DRED Kl I II IK 
ELEANOR OVER BY 



I II IAN Mill I R 
CECII IA ( ADIGAN 
HELEN ROTH 

I II I IAN IIYI I AND 
AN MA GUNDLACCH 
Nil All DIE 
ETHEL PATRICK 

N! I DA DWIKOW 

MERCEDES CRANSTON 



/ 






Pogt ft 



»SQ 










I 






\ 





m® 




















S. M. A. 







. M. A. — Sociability, Music, and Arts — is a society organized on the Stout 
campus in 1922. The primary purpose of the society is to provide opportunity 
for closer friendships among the members, all of whom have similar interests 
and ideals. S. M. A. takes an active part in all Stout activities and is espe- 
cially interested in promoting those activities which contribute to the finer apprecia- 
tions in life. 



OFFICERS 






Helen I. Larson 

A.u.oi Moi- 

1 1 1 NKIl MA BRAKER 

Adele Lancktox 
Miss Jeter 
Mrs. Grannis 



MARY FOX 

1 MM A SOGGE 

GLADYS APPELL 

I I I /.Mil III WILLIAMS 

FRANCES VERKERKE 



JANET STEN 
JAM HAMBLEY 
GEORGIA BLOOR 
I RANGES TADDY 



President 

Vice-President 

- Secretary 

Treasurer 

Faculty Ad\ isor 

Associate AJi isor 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
(MARIETTA BRAKER 
CLARA SCHOFNOFF 
ELEANOR AVF.RII.I. 
ADELE LANCKTON 
SAI I Y MARTIN 
C. Al I HANKS 

PLEDGES 

DOROTHY W II I IAMS 
MILDRED BELINA 
LUCILLE Mill R 
IRMA NICHOLS 



AAGOl 

BUELAH TODD 
LUCILE HAGERTY 
ESTHER SOKOLIK 
HELEN I. LARSON 
MARIORII ROSSI 1R 



RUTH COOPER 
ARBUTUS ANDERSON- 
MARGARET WINTI RS 
FLORENCE BABCOCK 



Pagt So 






T h 



e l u 





































'..,- *r+--i 






Pagt 81 















THE MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 

* J§ ■ ' HE only dramatic club en the Stout campus, the Manual Arts Players, has 

| I "^ successfully produced four plays during the past year. The Homecoming 

i3r play. "The Show Off,*' a comedy, and two plays presented at Christmas time, 

"Poor Maddalena," a fantasy, and "For the love of Pete," a farce, were 

enjoyable productions. A comedy. "W'hcn's Your Birthday?" was given on March 25. 

■.her farce, given at commencement time, concluded the dramatic work of the club. 

The plays did not furnish the only entertainment, for in the spring a costume ball 

iven in the gymnasium. 



OFFICERS 



Miss I. II l\\ BAKI K 

William F. Jahnki 

StEPHI N Ol 1 I. ERICH 

Elizabeth Williams 

lie CLE HaCERTY - 

Norman Brooks - 



Director 
Pn 
Vice President 
Secretary 

- Treasurer 
Business Manager 



HONORARY NUMBERS 
Mist Flora Snowdcn Mi" Christine Halseth 

Mr. S. Piulut Mamie MuiZ 






[OHN BARBER 

( OR] M BAYSTNGER 

MI! OKI I) BE1 l\ \ 
HENRIETTA BRAKER 
NORMAN BROOKs 
OTHY BRUHN 
\! K I < o; ki Ml i 
RUTH COOPF.R 
I Ml I I < IRRY 
BUI RNAD1 i N < USHMAN 
MARY II I NDRIZZI 
Bl RNARD HAG! N 
LUCILE HAG] KIY 



ORGANIZATION MEMBERS 

IANI I IAMBI 1 Y 
ALU I NASI I RTJD 
HORACE HI I DIN 
I II MAX HYI.l AM > 
VIM [AM IA1INKI 
I AW R IN (I [OHNSON 
ADM I I AN( K ION 
JOHN I AN( KION 
! ESI I! LOOMER 
MARSHA! I \1!i | 
ERNEST MULL] 
IRMA NICHOLS 
STEPHI X OM I I RICH 
hn OLSON 



Kl NNITH PATTERSON 
AL POELLIN 

:n REES1 
RALPH SCHAUDI 
FRANCIS SCHROEDER 
HELEN STETZER 
ARNOLD STORI 
MARY TOMsK 
NINA VAN HOUT1 N 
FRANC IS YIRKIRKI 
RUSSEL VALLIN 
RAY VIRNI R 
ELIZABETH VII.LIAMS 












31 T 












, 
















-.' ^-._»_ 



Pat* S3 



I 







TIIK SHCWsOJT 

A CHARACTER COMEDY IN THREE ACTS 
By George Kelly 

PRESENTED BY THE MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 
ASA HOMECOMING FEATURJ on NOVEMBER 4, I92j 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Clara ---------- Beurnadeen Cusbman 

Mrs. Fisher -.... Mildred Bclina 

Amy Elizabeth Williams 

Frank Hyland - Norman Brooks 

Mr. Fisher -- William Jab/ikc 

Joe ------- .\l Poellinger 

Aubrey Piper -- Russel Walliu 

Mr. Gill ----------- John Barber 

Mr. Rogers ---------- George Richards 

"Sign on che dotted line." 

Aubrey Piper 



A 












Page *4 



1 T h 



T C 













WHKTs'.S YOUR HIKTHDAY? 

A COMEDY DRAMA IN THREE ACTS 
By Aurania Romero! 

PRESENTED BY ill! MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS ON MARCH 23, 1928 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Malory Dwight ---------- Leslie Loo 

Ann Parsons Dorothy Bruhn 

Nabby Xash Mildred Belina 

Timothy Gale Al Pofllinger 

Nick Jameson Si pben Oellericb 

I.eonore Frames Verkerke 

Ben Ali Russel Wallin 

Clary Dwight Irma Nichols 

Jocham Nash Melvin Reese 

Lindy Na*h Alice Haslerud 

"I tell the past, the present, an' the future from the hand. 
the cards, an' by the stars. Wen is your birthday:-*" 









/'•.'«• ij 






STOUT Y. M. C. A. 

^^^^"^HE Stout Y. M. C. A. was organized for the following purposes: to lead 

I | students to faith in God through Jesus Christ; to promote their growth in 

^K Christian faith, especially through the study of the Bible; to challenge 

them in united effort to make the will of God effective in human society, 

and to extend His Kingdom throughout the world. 

The membership of the Y has grown three-fold during this past year, giving 
it a total of some sixty members. An advisory board has been organized which in- 
cludes five of the men on the Stout faculty. 

Service for others is one of the outward signs of a Christian. The Y aims to be 
of service both to its members and to the school through its religious, social, and 
educational activities. 

The Stout Y. M. C. A. has expanded to such .ut extent that it now has club 
rooms available for its members. This club room is located on the third floor of the 
gymnasium, and is used for meetings, study, and recreation. During this expansion 
the Y has taken over, in co-operation with the Y. \\". ( . A., the Stout Student Employ- 
ment Bureau. 

The regular meetings of the Y are held on Thursday evenings. During the past, 
these meetings have been featured by talks on topics of general interest by the faculty 
members, by outside speakers, and by students. 



ADVISORY BOARD 
Mr. C. A. lk>\\ \i \\ 
Mr. F. E. TUSTISON Mr. H. E. Good 









l. AND! RSON 
t). AUSTERUDE 
c . BUSWE1 I 
L. BE< K 
K. 141 ( KM R 
W. BUNKER 
D. COLE 
S. COTTON 
K. DIKI 

0. IN LI 

R. FRASER 
G. FERDON 
M. GOODWIN 
V. GLENN 
H. HEIDEN 

1. HARRIS 

s. ENG 



ROLL CALL 

L. GARDINER 

A. HEI I 
C. JACKSON 
E. JOHNSON 
G. JOHNSON 
A. KUBE 
w. KUBE 
V. (LAMM 
P. LARSON 
K. NOR R IS 
P. OLS( >\ 
M. OPEM 

l . MAI rsoN 

1). MOLDENHAU1 R 
M. McCULLOUGH 
N. PETERSON 



Ri v. W'vii RS 

Mr. \\". B. Davison 



C RI INHOLD 

<■. Kl< HARDS 
II. KIIMM 
H. KYSKIR(, 
C. STRONC, 
sDVK, 
T. THOMPSON 
S. TAR/VNSKI 

G. TRI wi ik 
I s< HAFFNER 
R. SCHAUDE 
W MM! I RSTRA 
R. WI KM R 

w. w TNG1 k 

\. Vi'l.W 

\. VI'OODBURN 

G. YOl 









Pant 86 






n 










l\ig<r 87 



-zm 






v 




THE MARQUETTE*LA SALLE CLUB 



f^^^ m *HE Marquette-LaSalle Club is the Catholic young women's and young men's 

f J club of The Stout Institute. At present the enrollment is about forty. 

IT"^ The purposes of the club are: to promote the common interests of the 

Catholic young women and young men at Stout; to create a feeling of fellow- 
ship and co-operation among these students by affording them a means of becoming 
better acquainted with one another; to inspire confidence and self-reliance when in the 
presence of others, by means of parliamentary practice and other activities; to co-operate 
with the other organizations of the school in social and other affairs; and to serve as an 
agent in the development and perpetuation of high moral character. 



O! i-icr.Rs 



Ml: HA1 I CvF.NGROS 

Mary Lv Endrizzi 
m \k1 k \nc 1iak 
Orlando Paciotti 



President 

Vice-President 
- Secretary 

Treasurer 

Miss Callahan and Mr. H. M. Hanson - Faculty Advisors 
Mr. S. E. Paulus - Honorary Member 


















Page SS 









i 



i 



1/ 





THE STOUT LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



® 



HE Stout Lutheran Student Association was organized December 7, 1927- The 
following week a meeting was held to adopt a constitution and to elect 
officers. 



The purpose of the Lutheran Student Movement in the higher institu- 
tions of learning is to bring about a close relationship among Lutheran students, and 
to assist in furthering such measures as will be beneficial to the Lutheran church at large. 
The work is carried on in a general way, not being directly connected with any particu- 
lar branch. 

Meetings were held throughout the second semester. Two delegates were sent to 
the regional conference which was held in Minneapolis in February. There were eighty 
Lutherans in attendance at Stout this past year. It is hoped that the organization may 
carry on and be of real service CO the student body. 



Lillian Miller 
Julian Johnson 
Gladys Appell 
Ernest Muller 



President 

Vit e-f resident 

Secretary 

Treasurer 










Pate 89 



1 



V E k r 






STOUT Y. W. C. A. 



fM 'HE Young Women's Christian Association of The Stout Institute, an old 

(\\ and well-established organization, had a membership of one hundred and 

\J-^ ten during the past year. Through their weekly contacts these j;irls were 

embued with the desire to create a spirit of Christian fellowship and pur- 

■ .il living. 

Through their Wednesday meetings, sales of various kinds, the annual Kid Party, 
special meetings with outside speakers, and their many other activities, they endeavored 
to create friendly attitudes on the campus and broaden their sphere of usefulness. The 
cabinet, consisting of eleven girls, is elected from the whol< -»n and they, with 

the aid of their committees, are responsible tor the organization of activities through- 
out th< 









oilK ERS 






Rika LEMBKE 
JEANNETTI Ja< KSON 

: \ Andi 

Blair 

S \ Tl MPI » 
\ [ENRII 1 ! A Sll VI RT 

Re BY I. KM AN 

Clara Boi and - 
111 MAN Hylland 

Mildred Kjj m k 

Jani 11a- 

Miss McCalmont - 



President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 
Membership 
World 

Religious Meetings 

Finance 
. Bible S 

Service 

Publicity 

- Vacuity Advisor 







-•* ♦♦"% ~?^\ f/ ^s ^2^£ 












P*£t 90 






















Page 9t 



1 T h 















GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

f •J ' HE Girls' Glee Club was reorganized at the beginning of the year, the mem- 
I | bership being limited to twenty girls instead of thirty as it had been 
ir^ formerly. 

A concert, consisting mainly of Indian music by Zamecnik. Logan, 
Lccurance. and Cadman, was presented in the spring. Practically all the efforts of 
the organization were centered in this direction. 

OFFICERS 

Coopi k Pirsi 

Jake Hambley .... Vice-Pn 
WiMiRjD Cooper .... '/>.. 
Henrietta Sievert ..... UI». 

Helca Rasmlw n - - htant librarian 
Minn Balerld Director 

MKMBERS 



First Soprano 



MILDRED OLSON- 
MAR JOR IE FUNK 



I MM A SOGGE 
VINIFRED COOPER 



HELGA RASMI 



HAZEL FLAGET 

HI ARIETTA SIEVERT 

i I ! ANOR OVERBY 

Second Soprano 

ARDELLA ANDERSON 
MILDRED KLEILER 

Alto 

IAM HAMB1 IV 

RLIH < OOl'I K 



ALICE HASH RUD 
LUCILLE MILER 



KATHRYN COUNSELL 
CHARLOTTE w'ATCHORN 



MABEL NIERGARD 



MU 




* • 




y.._" 















Pate 91 






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<r? 



r? 















Sx 



fe=fc 



ijs": -j 



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s 



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m 





{ 



12s* 



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/',.•»•<• 9$ 



i 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

f^\ "' HE first meeting of the Men's Glee Club in September found many old 
I J members back, not only from last year, but also from previous years. The 

^3r club membership was enlarged from sixteen to twenty to accommodate the 

talent available. 
As director of the club. Mr. Good has been unsparing in his efforts to develop an 
interesting organization. Because of his leaving at the end of the first semester, the 
men practiced twice a week to enable them to give their home concert in January. 
At the first business meeting the following officers were elected: 



Leslie Loonier 
Harold Ri ppi - 
George Richards 



President 

- Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



NUMBERS 
H. F. Good .... Dim tor 

Harold Tali max - - iccompanist 



FIRST Tl NOR 
( HESTER HKOW N 
STEPHEN OELLERICH 
SIDNEY COTTON 
NORMAN OLSON 
ESTEL1 ( URRY 



si. OND M NOR 
WILLIAM DOUR 
HAROl I) MAW KINS 
DOUGLAS HARRIS 
JOHN BARBER 
F. R. VAN M M \ 



FIRST BASS 
w M. I . BROWN 

vie TOR HOI 1 1 RT 
I. (.. I Ml RSON 
\Y \l PR] |) ROSE 



SECOND BASS 
RUSSJ I W Al I IN 
i ESI I! LOOMER 
CI.AIR1 KNUTSON 
HAROLD REPP1 









GEORGE RICHARDS Al FR1 D I RICKSOX 



l'aee 94 






I 













STOUT QUARTETTE 

ONE of the most popular musical organizations of the school this year has been 
the Stout Quartette, which has proved its worth and ability on numerous 
occasions. The demand for these popular entertainers was so great at times 
that it was impossible to accommodate all the requests that were received. 
Some of the engagements and appearances of the quartette arc as follows: Stout 
Homecoming, Glee Club Concert, school organization banquets, school dances. Tower 
Benefit Movie. All-City Football Banquet. Lutheran Men's Association. Churches, town 
Organization dinners, and programs on various occasions. 



V A. I I 

H. Hawkins 



First Tenor L. Lo 

Second Tenor R. W'ai.i.in 

H. Tali man - Accompanist 



First Bass 
Second Bass 







m^mtMmmumm^aMflMmim rn --*> 



\ 









mm* 



w-w~ T 



■ i m ^y^ 



» ■«■ - 







THE BAND 

/*"Y^ ^ ONF organization in our system of student activities has been more loyal 
^" I in its support than cur ever ready band. It has stimulated pep and furthered 

L school spirit throughout the entire school year. Homecoming events, football 
and basket-ball games have been augmented by carefully prepared musical 
programs. The success of these programs is a result of the combined efforts of the 
director, Mr. Charles Ingraham, and the thirty participating members. 

It is a self-evident fact that the quality of the Band is continually improving; i: 
will serve the school in the future to an even greater extent than it has served it in 

the past. 






OFFICERS 



Ci.ii i ord Carlson 
\\ \i i ri i) Rose - 
K i \ \ i th Patterson 
Harold Tali man 
Charlls Ingraham 
John Faville 



President 

Vice-President 

s, < retary-Treasurer 

Librarian 
- Director 

Facility Advisor 









Page >/> 












I 




BERTHA TAl.-vilK I1A1.3. 



BERTHA TAIXTER HALL is the oldest cf the three dormitories provided for 
Household Arts students at Stout. The building was once the residence of 
an old Menomonic family, prominent during the pioneer days and for whom 
the dormitory was named. The hall accommodates about thirty girls, usually 
from the upper classes. This year, however. Freshman and Sophomore girls were 
admitted. 

Bertha Tainter Hall is located apart from the rest of the school on the banks of 
Lake Menomin. The many pines and oaks help to seclude it from the public eye. and 
nuke it a charming place to rest after a long day of work and study. 



i 
















v 








I.Y."NAVOOD HALL 



GE> 


JUS 




SPECIES 


ACTIVITY 


Bachmann 


- 


- 


Dr. Freda 


- 


Caring for her many children 


Anderson 


- 


- 


"Art" 


- 


Buying 


Anderson 


- 


- 


"Emmy" 


- 


Tuning us up 


Anderson 


- 




"Louie*' 


- 


Making a go of it 


Appcll 


- 


- 


"Glady" 


- 


Cobbing with art 


Banks 


- 




"Gale- - 


- 


Boosting the Tower 


Bertadatto 


- 


- 


"Bert" - 


- 


Vh, : 


Cadigan 


- 




"Ceal" - 


- 


Cringing out ths Irish 


Dec 


- 


- 


"Ni" - 


- 


Being true to on? 


De Yong 


- 


- 


"Annadee" 


- 


Telling Western stories 


Ekman 


- 


- 


"Rubens" 


- 


Eating crackerjack 


Endrizzi 


- 


- 


"Mary I.u" 


- 


Canning cherries for railroads 












1 T 






LYNWOOD HAI.].— Continued 



\ 



\ 



GENUS 

Forck 

Hagcrty 

Engclbrckt 

Hamblcy 

Jackson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Krug - 

Larson 

Leonard 

Lindcrson 

I.indquist 

Lindqui\t - 

Linn 

McGregor 

Malcolm 

Martin 
Novak 
O'Brien - 
Roth - 
Seim 

Schrocdcr 
Soggc 
Sokolik 
Spink 
Sten 
Stet/er 
Sundc - 
Taddy - 
Todd - 
Vater 
White - 



SPECIES 

"Annie" - 
"Lukic" 
"Tiny" 
"Mich" 
"Jacky" - 

jgy" 

"Granny" 
"Babe" 
"Angel" - 
"Dot" - 
"Gracious" 
"Al" - 
"Lu" 
"Phily" 
"Mac" 
"Betty" 
"Sal" 
"HP - 
"Bush" - 
"Chis" - 
"Dot" 
"Frances" 
"Soggc" - 
"Sok" - 
"Lutz" - 
"Jen" - 
"Helie" - 
"Cody" 
"Frances" 
"Bculah" 
"Vater" - 
"Mary Ann" • 



ACTIVITY 

Presiding 

Fall, falling, fallen 

Being Superior 

Ukeing 

Speeding up 

Solving the world's problems 

Going home 

Trying to decide 

Keeping 'em guessing 

Giggling 

Smiling 

Keeping sis company 

Ditto 

Laughing 

Stepping with Hans 

Homing 

Drinking cofTec at Chase's 

Making the postoflkc worthwhile 

Enjoying life 

Still talking 

Answering the telephone 

Being with Frances 

Warbling 

Homcmaking 

Longing 

Staying home 

Wondering what to study next 

Being nice and natural 

Buying more stationery 

Developing individuality 

Dating — waiting 

Suggesting 



/ 









W&D 



Pcg4 



-: 



r h 









i 




\ 



1. Gladys Nicolai 

2. Clara Carlson 

3. Frances Vcrkcrkc 

4. Mildred Bclina 
s. Florence Weiner 

6. Alida Hasscmcr 

7. Eleanor Ovcrby 

8. Ardclla Anderson 

9. Ruth Bossuener 

10. Josephine Edinger 

11. Anita Gundlach 

12. Ruth Cooper 

13. Winifred Cooper 
M. Elizabeth Doolcy 



TAINTER ANNEX 



She finds happiness in a Victrola and an old rocking 
chair. 

Studious, ambitious, and sincere. 

We all love a friend like "Frana." 

A future chemistry teacher at Stout. 

What are the wild waves saying? 

A future aesthetic dancer. 

To know her is to love her. 

We expect big things from big people. 

Just a little bit of happiness. 

Ten years hence — a conscientious teacher who loves all 

her students. 
"Mac's" sister — "Oh, That Saxophone Waltz." 
Sweet, laughing Ruthie; may she always be happy. 
Just a little girl. 
She may change, but her hearty laugh will l>e the same. 



Page too 



- 









TAIISTIR ANNEX— Continued 






15. Frances Hill 

16. Alice Cockerill 

17. Elva Page 

18. Edith Brcvig 

19. Addye Taylor 

20. Marietta DcCramer 

21. Esther Sichler 

2 2. Margaret Blair 

23. Jessie Larson 

24. Alice Thorsen 

2 5. Reka Lembke 

26. Frances Nelson 

27. Alma Winzer 

28. Mary Tomsic 

29. Mary Kaschak 

30. Xina VanHouten 

31. Charlotte Watchorn 

32. Orpha Stevens 

33. Lauretta Schmidt 

34. Kathleen Shannon 

3 5. Mable Xecgaard 

36. Alice Haslcrud 

3 7 . Mildred Kleiler 

38. Hazellc Flagct 

39. Dorothy Gant 

40. Lucille Miler 

41. Florence Babcock 

42. Margaret Winters 

43. Vivian Hewitt 

44. Winifred Arnold 

45. Leola Vreeland 

46. Fern Wendt 

47. Dorothy Bruhn 

48. Marjoric Robb 

49. Hope Dcwar 

5 0. Margaret Wells 

51. Janet Wells 

52. Kathryn Counscll 

53. Elizabeth Jenkins 

54. Henrietta Sievert 

5 5. Xelda Damrow 



A quiet little school teacher. 

Because of a life-long liking tor science, she makes i 
famous chemistry teacher. 

Will publish a book on "Subtle Humor." 
Quiet, but never idle. 

Banks will play a part in her life. 

A faithful member of the Annex basket-ball team. 

Men may come, men may go. 

But I go on forever. 

She brings lots of pep and lots of fun. 

Mumps! More Mumps! 

True blue clear through. 

Stout will be proud of her in the future. 

She seems fitted for a domestic career. 

One of that noisy second floor bunch. 

Her optimism will lead her far. 

She'll never have to count the calories. 

She'll abandon Home Ec. for Dramatics. 

Music will be her guiding star, leading her to lands afar. 

"Jerry, and nothing but Jerry." 

She will some day realize the value of speed. 

Oh Raymond! Where art thou? 

Her athletic sense will raise her to heights unknown. 

Who can foretell what will become of her? 

Just the quiet kind of a friend. 

A famous seamstress she will be. 

Will she ever grow up? 

The Annex reporter. Good work, Lucille. 

Happy-go-lucky is our Flo. 

Just one of the quartette from Dclavan. 

At Stout they were always together. 

And they'll stay that way forever. 

She will spend years in solving the problem. 

"Am I too short?" 

May she be happy during her married life on a farm. 

"The Campus Flirt." 

Hope, faith, and charity. The greatest (in this case) 
is hope. 

Poor little roommate. Why did Janet pick on her?. 

We can't imagine her married and settled down. 

A conscientious and willing worker. 

The only way to have a friend is to be one. 

Tasks either great or small, 

Henry masters them all. 

A loving disposition and everybody's friend. 






C 









ISSs 



Page tot 



=n 



• 









STOUT METALLURGY CLUB 

y^9^ m ^HlS year marks the fourth anniversary of the Metallurgy Club. These years 
f | have witnessed a noticeable improvement in the work and scope of the 
sr organization, the object of which is to bring together a group of men inter- 

ested in metals and metal work, to encourage a desire for further development 
in this work, and to effect a closer fellowship among the men who arc majoring in the 
metal courses. 

At the meetings, held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month, interesting 
papers dealing with some phase of metallurgy arc read and discussed. This year each 
report W3S mimeographed and a copy was given each member. In this way each 
member will have in his possession, when he enters the teaching field, valuable lecture 

material. 

The club has grown steadily in importance and will continue to be regarded as one 
of the most practical organizations in the school. 



OFFICERS 



Robert Healy 

\\ M. Pi ll RSON - 

Herbert Ritzman 
Gerald Flrdon 



President 
- Vice -Pi, 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



Mr. Flovd Kicth 



1 1>\\ ak;> 

vm. L BROVN 

HOY I) BUR 
DONA! I) c OLE 
Ik MM DO C AIRELLI 
ALFRED 1 RICKSON 



HONORARY MKMBERS 
Mr. H. F. Good 

MEMBERS 

Mr. H. ( . MM Ms 
ROBERT HEALY 

HAROLD HAW KINs 
(.1 RAID FLRDON 
AI LAN MURRAY 



Mr. R. L. Welch 



JOHN NOTEBAART 
PHI! II' OLSON 

w m, im n 

WM. RITZMAN 
HI NRY ROSS 
GILBERT TRF.W I I k 
















Pose '0/ 
































Page 103 









TOW' 



■ 










AREME' 

f J* ■ HE Arcme Society is open only to students and faculty who arc members of 
f |-^ the Order of the Eastern Star. Its main objective is to further the social 
Vly relationship between the members. This year the society has also sponsored 
^* a series of public card parties. We feel that through the Areme we arc- 

able to maintain a live interest in our lodge. 









OFFICERS AM) NUMBERS 

Phyllis Finn President 

Kathleen Shannon - - - Vice-President 

Ruby Ekman s retar) 

Dorothy Bahr Treasury 

MlSS BUCHANAN .-- Honorary Member 






Gail G. Banks 

Jam Ham hi is 



Mabel Nf.ercard 



Gladys Pi n n 
le Webb 






Page t'>4 




















ff 



TROWEL CLUB 

HE Trowel Club is composed of faculty and student members of The StouT 9t 
Institute who arc affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 

The purposes of the club are: to promote the common interests of 



the members; to create a spirit of friendship among the men by providing'./-^ 
with a means of becoming better acquainted with one another; and to promote ■ / " 
cial and other activities of the school. 



them 
the socia 

Meetings arc held twice a month. Joint meetings and socials arc held occasionally 
with the Stout chapter of the Areme . 



Ol I ICI-RS 



Arthur Mo* i k^ 
Norman Brooks 
L. W. Brown 

( . A. How \: \\ 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Faculty Adt ism 






MEMBERS 



ERNEST BERGR1 N 
CLYDE A. BOWMAN 
NORMAN BROOKS 
LESLIE BROWN 
WM. L BROWN 
FLOYD BURGESS 



GEORGI 1)1 ( K! R 
HENRY FISHER 
VICTOR GLENN 
( I AY TON HALVERSON 

: . < . m ii'i'i I 
ARTHUR MOW] RS 



STEPH1 N OELLERICH 
RICHARD RADK1 
CHARLES STRONG 
Ml I YIN S* 
GILBERT TREWEEK 
WM. WINGI R 



i v~ 



Page 105 






• 






THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

f^T^* HE Women's Athletic Association has for its purpose 
f J the promotion of interest and participation in ath- 
\r*^ letics for the girls of the school. The club is or- 
ganized on the point system, the girls being awarded 
points for their work in various sports, according to the plan 
worked out by the members. 

Before the girls Can become members, they must earn one 
hundred fifty points, thus showing their interest and willing- 
ness to carry on the club's activities. 

Other awards for points are: W. A. A. emblem for 
-i\ hundred fifty points, letter for eleven hundred points, and 
sweater for fifteen hundred points. Points .ire earned by 
participation in various athletic activities, including hiking, 
swimming, skating, hockey, basket-ball, volley-ball, baseball, 
and tennis. 

The W . A. A. sponsors the following inter-class tourna- 
ments; hockey, basket-ball, volley-ball, and swimming meets. 

In February the club gave a Valentine Dance, the affair 
being different from the usual school dances and featuring 
stunts and novelty dances. 

For its advisor the Association has Miss B.ilerud, our phys- 
ical education instructor. 












Page 106 






!i 



v 










Pate toj 



^ 



\ 




I 



STOUT RIFLE CLUB 

f^^^*^ HE Stout Rifle Club, which has for its purpose the promoting of better 
| |"^ marksmanship among its members, was organized on May I7, 1927. It is 
^^X affiliated with the National Rifle Association from which it receives yearly 
allotments of ammunition and equipment for target practice. The club, 
which is divided into three teams, has a total of sixty members. All phases of rifle 
practice and marksmanship arc taught to the members according to and in full com- 
pliance with rules and regulations given by the National Rifle Association. Indoor 
rifle practice is held on a multiple range which the club has built in the Stout Armory. 
Arrangements are completed for outdoor target practice with high power rifles on the 
Company A's range during the summer months. Students, faculty members, and em- 
ployees of The Stout Institute are eligible for membership. 



OI IK IRS 



Paul C. Nelson 
Ion Hanke 
Ray Werm k 
Charles R. Stro\(. 



President 

\'/( e-Presideni 

S < /<m 

Treasurer 









Pag* 108 




BENNY'S BAND 

•"j""'^ RACTICALI.Y all of the Stout parties in the past year have danced to 
I^J the music of Benny's Band. This orchestra was reorganized with a nucleus 
IT from Bud's Novelty Band which play for college dances last year. 

The orchestra is composed of Stout and Mcnomonie high school students. 
The variety of their programs was maintained by constant practice, and their popularity 
increased steadily during the year. 

The personnel includes: Bernard Schadney, director and violin; Mrs. Vera Tilleson 
and John Barber, piano; John Favillc, and George Mcrdutt, drums; Noel Winn. Philip 
Olson, and Theodore Pierson, saxophones; Paul Kabot and Bud Micheels, trumpets; 
Claire Knutson, trombone; Harold Rcppe, banjo; Leonard Howe, bass. 






I 









"•^ 



v 














( 



h 






PuKf no 



HHHBHmaVMMHn 




ATHLETIC 






=L 













THE STOUT ATHLETIC COUNCIL 1927*28 

f/^ ' HE aim and desire of the council is to direct and encourage all kinds of 

■ I "^ athletics, award letters, emblems, and monograms, and to maintain the highest 

^J*X possible standards in all athletics in which The Stout Institute is represented. 

Representatives are appointed from the faculty by the President of 

the school. Two students from each class are elected by their classmates, and hold 

office for one school year. 



C. A. Bowman- 
Emma Socce 
Floyd Keith 



Pre 

Secretary 

Business Mattagi r 




FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES 
C. A. Bowman, Floyd Keith, Miss Balerud, S. E. Paulus 

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES 

Seniors: Gladys Vatcr, Richard Radkc Sophomores: Adele Lanckton, Salter Jeske 
Juniors: Emma Soggc, Leslie Loomer Freshmen: Florence Babcock, Roland Eraser. 












Page us 












COACH PAULUS 







S. E. Paulus, coach of athletics at Stout, 
started his work here in the fall semester of 
1927. Much praise is due this man, not for 
the conditions of the teams, nor for the show- 
ing they made in the conference, but for the 
fighting spirit which he instilled into his teams 
whether winning or losing. He has the ability 
to whip raw material into shape. He believes 
in clean, sportsman-like competition. 






CAPTAIN HANKE 



Captain Ion Hankc won his title through 
his ability as a football player, and his clean, 
sportsman-like attitude on the field. "Duff" 
has played two years under the blue and white 
and was always On the job and feared by his 
opponents. His first year found him in the 
backfield, but this year he was shifted to center 
and was Stout's defensive backbone. He was 
ranked as one of the foremost centers in the 
slate conference. 







CAPTAIN HANK! 



Page 114 






V E F 



THE 1927 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 









September — 

24 The first game of the season was a victory for the Stout Trainers in the 
defeat of the Winona State Teachers, score 6 to 12. 

October — 

1 Battling on a wet field at La Crosse found Stout playing its first conference 

game, coming out on short end of a 26 to 7 score. 
8 In their second victory Stout defeated the Army eleven to the tunc of 25 to 0. 

1 5 The big game of the year at River Falls. Over three hundred students went 
over. Stout took its second defeat, but tried a corking aerial attack which 
nearly proved successful. Score 19 to 7. 

29 In their first appearance on home soil the Trainers bowed to Superior, 6 to 21, 
but not before we had thrown several firebrands into the smoothly running 
Tubbs machine. 

\'m ember — 

5 Homecoming, Eau Claire here. Real rivalry. The boys from over cast were 
entirely outplayed, outwitted, and outguessed. Score 10 to 6. 

THE 1928 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

September — 

29 We play La Crosse on home grounds. 

October — 

6 Paulus' machine plays at Fort Snelling. 
13 River I alls here. Homecoming. 

20 Trainers meet the Stevens Pointers here. 
27 Stout plays Superior on their field. 

.Voi ember — 

16 A journey to Whitewater Normal. 

23 On the last trip we play Eau Claire Normal. 




















Cdflll': 



LRCHUL 






I'age 11$ 



r h 













ATHLIT1CS ADMINISTRATION 

George F. Miller Director of Athletics 

S. E. Paulus Head Coach 

A. MlTTEN, R. Radke Assistant Coaches 

C. A. Bowman Pres. Athletic Council 

Floyd Keith Faculty Manager 

Arthur Mowers Student Manager 

Lawrence Johnson ...... Assistant Student Manager 

Ion Hanke - Captain 

Martin Opem, Lewis Erchui Captains-Elect 

JT2 . 
















Pax* "6 













1928 VARSITY 

M. Crcngn L. Loomcr. '28 

N. Olson. '29; D- Harris, '30; G. Fcrdon. '29 

C Brown. '50; V. Jeskt, '29 

I. Hankc. '29 

W. Peterson, '28; M. Jackson, '21 

v ». 1'wmtti. 'JOj I). I vans '29 

H. Anderson. '29 

H. Hawkins. '30; J. Notebaart. "29 

I I rchul. *29 

M. Opem, "29; J. Johnson. '29 

F. Decker. '29j W. Peterson. '21 



Right End 

Right Tackle 

Right Guard 

Center 

left Guard 

Left Tackle 

let 

Quarterback 

Right Half 

Left Half 



Fullback 



ft^.:..-flfe r - 



















Pat* 117 



TTie TOWER 







1928 FOOTBALL SEASON 

By 
Julian N. Johnson 

(~\ y\ HEX Sil Paulus entered the Trainer camp as head football coach of The Stout 
/ I I I nst ' tutc team, he was met with a group of thirty-five husky candidates 
V"^r that were working for various positions on the varsity squad. 

Much praise is due Coach Paulus, not only for the condition, but also 
for the general morale of the team. He developed a group of pluggers who fought 
every inch of the field, winning or losing. Under his guidance and the field generalship 
of Captain Hanke, the season was successful. 

Fourteen veterans reported for the first practice, Captain Hanke, Cvengros, Lootner, 
Olson, Fcrdon, Opem, Peterson, Jackson, Paciotti, Hawkins, Notebaart, Erchul, Decker, 
Johnson, and Radke. Of course, there were early season defects, and the loss of Radke 
was a severe blow to the Stout machine, but the general results were fine. 

The first tilt of the season found the Trainers at Winona State Teachers' College 
where they emerged victorious with a 12 to 6 score. Stout scored in the second 
quarter on a series of passes, with Cvengros spearing a thirty yard heave from Radke. 
Later in the same period,, Notebaart intercepted a pass and dashed eighty yards for a 
touchdown. 

The next week Stout opened the conference season at LaCrosse. Wide awake to 
all opportunities and taking full advantage of all breaks, the down river team scored 
a 3 1 to 6 victory. Erchul smashed over for the only touchdown in the second quarter. 
Hawkins, playing his first game at the quarterback position, came through in fine 
style, passing, running, blocking, in fact, handling the team like a seasoned general, 
but both Erchul and Hawkins received such punishment that they were on the 
casualty list for the next three weeks. 

The following week the team journeyed to St. Paul to meet the Army eleven where 
they demonstrated a beautiful passing attack that the soldiers could not solve. After 





V 






LOOMER 



PACIOTTI 



ANDERSON 



HARRIS 



■ U3gK^ 



Page nS 



31 







1928 FOOTBALL SEASON— Continued 



several exchanges of punts, in which departments Stout excelled, Snclling tumbled and 
Stout recovered on the Army five yard line. Decker carrying the ball over for the first 
six point marker. In the second quarter a beautiful pass from Peterson to Cvengros 
gave Stout its second touchdown; again in the third quarter Decker reached high 
into the air, gathered in the oval, and trotted twenty yards for the third touchdown. 
The final six points came in the latter part of the fourth quarter when Mike speared 
one of Peterson's speedy passes and romped twenty-five yards for the fourth and final 
touchdown, bringing the score to 25-0. Paciotti and Olson played strong defensive 
games and often tore through the line, stopping the Army backs before they could 
get under way. 

The next game found the Blue and White battling the powerful River Falls 
aggregation at their homecoming celebration. Fighting consistently and threatening 
the enemy's goal in all periods. Stout was nevertheless no match for River Falls on 









(HV)\ 



[OHNSON 



11 RDON 






1928 FOOTBALL SEASON— Continued 






Straight football and bowed to the Teachers 19 to 0. Anderson displayed some nice 
tackling and often stopped onward inarches of the River Falls backs. The entire line 
fought like demons even it the odds were against them and often broke through to 
stop the opposition. Opem played a strong defensive game, making several tackles in 
the open field which would have meant sure touchdowns if missed. The Pctcrson-tO- 
N'otcbaart passing combination functioned beautifully at times and often completed 
passes for much yardage. 

Then came a weeks rest, time which Paulus used in preparation for stopping the 
powerful attack of the Northerners, and stop them he did. It was the first appearance 
of the Blue and White on home soil and, though they received their third conference 
defeat, it was not before Stout had thrown several demoralizing firebrands into the 
smooth Tubbs machine that the argument was settled. All three touchdowns came 
in what may be termed "flukes;" Stout opened up with a vicious aerial attack that 
scored the first touchdown and was on its way to the second when the breaks began. 
From then on conditions reversed and Superior scored three times, to end the fray with 
an 18 to 6 score. Captain Hanke demonstrated his ability by stopping the fleet Superior 
backs in their tracks. Jackson played a strong defensive game and much of that 
day's performance placed him at guard on the All Conference Eleven. Brown, who 
went into the line, held his own and few yards were gained over his position. 

The final game of Stout's Football season was a fitting conclusion to the Home- 
coming program when they administered a terrible beating to Eau Claire, 8 to 0. 
The score tells little because the Blue and White threatened repeatedly, but due to 
the adverse weather conditions fumbling was frequent. The famous Petcrson-to- 
Notebaart combination brought the ball up to the enemy's eight yard line; after Decker 
and Opem had advanced the ball to the two yard line, F.rchul smashed over for the 
lone touchdown, a safety coming early in the opening period. Stout had little use 






PETERSON- 



JACKSON' 
All Conference CiiurJ 



BROW \ 



NOTEBAART 

:cncc Quarterback 
Second Team 















Page ix> 



- J 



T h 















■ 



i 





1928 FOOTBALL SEASON— Continued 

for the forward pass, finding the visitor's line easy at all times. In the fourth 
quarter Stout threatened, having the ball on the one yard line only to be held for 
downs. There was no question in the minds of the homecoming crowds as to which 
was the superior team. Stout gained ground on nearly every thrust and should have 
scored at least four touchdowns. Eau Claire looked good only once, that in the 
last minute of play when a Stout punt was caught on the dead run and returned to 
the eight yard line. Stout held, in this one supreme test, without apparent difficulty, 
rounding out as clean a win as could be recorded. 

The season closed found the Trainers making a percentage of 500, winning three 
and losing three. Thus ended the season of \92j. Although apparently unsuccessful 
in winning a high place in the state conference, Stout made a creditable showing 
that upholds the laurels of the Blue and White. 





I)l( Kl K 



HAWKINS 



II SKI 













Page til 




Jl The TOWERS 





<v* 



Back MVOi Unhlcr. ('■iiiullach, Kcss, Muller, Hanson 

Middle raw. Head Coach I'aulus, Col ton, Kuhc. Oellerich, Heck, Heath. Coach Ka<ikc 

Front ron: Morrison. Rcedcr, Becker, Frascr, (apt.. Tucker, Paulug, Kariak 



THE FKOSH SQUAD 

REVIEW OF THE 1931 FRESHMEN FOOTBALL SEASON 

OR the first time in the history of the school. The Stout Institute has been 
represented by a Frosh football team. 




The team started the season with about twenty-five yearlings who 
answered the call. Under the tutelage of Coach Radkc the Frosh squad 
developed into a smooth working unit that scrimmaged against the varsity, giving 
the latter stiff opposition at all times. 

The only encounter that the squad entered into took place at River Falls where 
they emerged on the short end of a 10 to 13 score. 

Captain Frazer, Paulus, Hanson, Reeder, Kogl, and Morrison seemed to stand out 
during the season and should prove strong contenders for the various varsity positions 
when the call is issued for the 1928-29 season. 



I'ORC Utt 



^S«fc 





OUR CHEER LEADERS 









OUTSTANDING in the 1927-28 season of Stout's competition arc the four 
persons who have merited and received the school's sincere admiration. The 
responsibility of leading the cheering of Stout fell upon Harold Rcppe. 
rooter king, Corene Baysinger, Roland Norris, and Bill Gardner. This 
team of cheer leaders has shown what real school spirit at Stout should be. 

Harold Reppc. rooter king, performed his duties in a most satisfactory way. During 
his List year with us he has given us his best. 

Corene Baysinger. a senior and the only girl on the team, was always peppy and 
a very interested follower of all the games. 

Roland Norris and Bill Gardner, acting as cheer leaders for the first time, seemed 
almost like veterans at the job. Both did all they could for the promotion of school 

spirit. 



«/*& 






Pate Hi 



■3T T h e 













» 



Fred De< ker 
Captain 



S. E. Paulus 
Basket-ball coacb 





$TOfy { 












Pagt H4 










tebaart, Mower*, Student Manager. 

: h '.■ :<!c 



.NrriKRiiNOoi:.^ 













- 









THE BASKET-BALL SEASON 

By 
Ruth Lindall 

/^ 1^ HEX Coach Paulus issued his first call for basket-ball material he had no small 

/ I | problem facing him. As was witnessed all year. Stout had a schedule that 

V<^/ may be classed as the toughest in the entire conference. Thirty-five men 

responded to first summons; this squad worked for about two weeks; then 

the usual elimination began and the squad was cut down to twelve men. 

With the loss of such men as Radke and Tillcson, all conference forwards. Coach 
Paulus faced the problem of developing a pair of forwards who could take their place. 
Opem. Xotebaart. Schaudc, Jackson, and Cvcngros alternated during the season, with 
the major duties falling on Opem and Xotebaart. Peterson played his third and last 
year at center while Decker and Greeley did duty on the rear wall. 

In the first game of the season with the Winona Teachers' College, five extra min- 
utes of play were needed for the Trainers to win. In the extra period the Trainers 
showed a new style of play by coming through with a 21 to 28 victory. 

The next game with Luther Phalen was a duplicate of the first, a win for the 
Trainers. 

The first setback of the season came when the boys lost to Fort Snelling by a 28 to 
19 score. 

The same week another game was played at Luther Phalen. but this ended in a 
defeat for the Trainers bv a score of 28 to 19. 






( VI \GROS 



(,Rl I I I V 



JACKSON 












Page 116 










THE BASKET-BALL SEASON— Continued 

The first conference game was lost to River Falls. It was a fast, hard fought game. 
However, the Falls boys had a little edge on Stout boys and beat them by a score of 
29 to 19. 

Stout's second conference game was played with I.aCrosse. Coach Tyler's basketeen 
showed excellent form and defeated Stout by 32 to I7. Xotebaart led in scoring. 
Greeley and Decker played a steady game at guard. 

Thursday, February 9, found Stout battling her old rival on the home court. Both 
teams played splendid basket-ball. The game ended with Stout 27, Eau Claire 22. 

The next week Stout met LaCrosse and suffered a defeat. Though the Trainers 
fought hard, they could not quite out-fight their opponents and got the short end of 
32 to I7 score. 

The next game was played away from home with Superior. Superior kept the 
lead through the entire game; the game was a slow and rugged one, the Trainers coming 
back with a 36 to 22 beating. 

A fast and furious game played at Stout was that with Superior, when at the last 
minute of play the Trainers lost 31 to 29. 

The last game of the season was played at Eau Claire. The entire student body 
backed the team and Stout appeared at Eau Claire one hundred per cent. Stout started 
the game with a fine show of teamwork, but Eau Claire had a little over them and won 
31 to 2 7 . 

























NOTEBAART 



OPEM 



I 1 ! 11 RSON 



SCHAIDI 






Page lt7 



. 







<A 



S with football, this is the first time in the history of the school that St 
has been represented on the hard court by a Frosh team, and stiH more unu 
is it to be represented by such a squad as the student body had a chance 
witness in action this year. 



Captained by "Lu" Paulus and coached by Rox Radkc, this band of yearlings en- 
tered eighteen frays, and out of every battle they emerged victorious. Such a record is 
one we read about but never see. This tribe tasted victory in every conference camp; 
with three years to perfect their style of attack and play, they should hang up an 
enviable record for their Alma Mater. 

Besides defeating both River Falls and Eau Claire twice, they won the city cham- 
pionship which lis. a credit to the school and an honor to the Frosh class of 1931. 





/>,--y 



FEATURES 

Memories 
Menomonie 



feft 



*** 




HENDRES 












CALENDAR 



Sep/ c in her — 

6. We started school. 

9. The first dance of the year w.is .in 
S. S. A. mixer. 

10. Call issued for football men. Big 
response. 

12. Churches of Mcnomonic gave so 
rial* for the students. 

14. Warning issued by the Sophs for 

the Frosh to get their green caps. 

15. Sophs came to school and found 

the Frosh emblem at the top of 
the flag pole. 




I7. Benny's Band played for another 

matinee. 



S( ptember — Cont'd. 

18. Freshmen girls were entertained by 

the Home Economics Club at a 
reception. 

19. A green flag floating in the breeze 

was the cause of several dips in 
the tank. 

20. Messrs. Brown and Tustison left for 

U. of W . 

21. The M. A. P. admitted thirteen 

new members. 

2 5. Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. mixer 
dance. Lots of pep and lots of 
fun. 




Ber\uie s f^anol E.Tvtertaan.s 

24. Paulus' new squad showed possibili- 
ties in first encounter, — a victory 
of 12 to 6 over Winona Teachers' 
College. 

27. The Stout Student Advisory Board 

replaced the former Student 
Council. 

28. The school directory helped us to 

identify our new acquaintances. 

















Past is- 1 



Jl Th 



m 






\ 



CALENDAR 



Sep I cm her — Cont'd. 

27. Wc enjoyed looking through the 
first issue of The Stoutonia. 

30. The Men's Glee Club put on a live- 
ly dance. 

October — 

1. We were defeated at LaCross.. Jl 
to 6. 

J. Model Home, with many features 
made possible by Stout students, 
thrown open to public. 

6. The Hecrman quartet was our first 

Lyceum number. Well attended. 

7. The S.M.A. sponsored a dance, fea- 

turing Benny's Band. 



October — Cont'd. 

8. Faculty and student body suffering 
from an unprecedented spell of 
hot weather. 

11. Stout defeated Fort Snelling at 
Snclling, 25 to 0. 

14. Interesting decorations featured 

the Metallurgy dance. 

15. Stout defeated by River Falls at the 

Falls, 19 to 0. Over three hun- 
dred people, both students and 
townspeople, attended the game. 

I7. Frosh defeated the Sophs in the 
first bag rush in the history of 
the school. Entertainment for 
all except the participants. 




JitJf* it) i**»iyx cLu Oh, Mt ft-lkr /j.j/ 










r h 












CALENDAR 



October — ( 



21. The railroad officials wore investiga- 
ting a charge that a number of 
the Stout Freshmen had en 
a little trip on the Northwej 
Railroad and had secured live- 
stock rates in so d< 

24. The Stout Rifle Club began its in- 
door shooting. 

--. Chandra Gooneratne, a young man 
from India, gave a talk on the 
youth movement in aaembly. 

28. A Special pep assembly held at noon 
for the Superior game. 



29. 



We were defeated by Superior : 1 
to 6. but when that game wax 
over. Superior knew that they 
had played football. Were 
proud of our team. 




Old 

^ p pe a. r on. 



.Yoi ember — 

4. The M.A.P. play. "The Show Off." 
given in the Auditorium, was the 



Not i nsbtr — Cont'd. 



first event of Homecoming. At 
10:30. the same night, the owl 
pep test was held. Boy! what 
pep. 

The big game. We won fro: 

Claire 8-0. The student body 
was so full of pep it neari 
ploded. The victorious team and 
coach were carried from the field 
by the F. O. B. and the student 
body. It was a great game. 
that night the victory dance 
eld. It was announced that 
Olson's Art Shop won the win- 
dow prize, and the Hyperians 
won the float prize. 

A new card system tried out at the 

Amu 

Ian Hankc opened the Men's Club 
Rooms. 



9. 



10. 




II. The Stoutonia sponsored a peppy 
dance at the gym. 

15. The Science Club became a new 
school organization. 

is. All-school cage tourney started 
with many teams on deck. 

21. The Stoutonia announced that we 

were to have a hockey team. 

22. Eight printers' devils were initiated 

into the S.T.S. 









T h 



• 









CALENDAR 




Not ember — Cont'd. 

24. Thanksgiving Day. 

25. The Tower Tacky Drag. Biggest 

hit of the season. Dusty was 
plenty wild and Dorothy looked 
plenty meek. They both took 
first prizes for costumes. 

28. Basket-ball call sounded and re- 

sponded to by about thirty-six 
men. 

29. Final game of all school tourney. 

Won by Senior Six, champions of 
the school. 

December — 

2. Everyone enjoyed the Tower Bene- 

fit Movie. It was appropriate, be- 
ing Marion Davies in "The Fair 
Co-Ed. " 

3. The Trowel Club was reorganized 

with fifteen charter members. 

4. The Hyperians, the S.M.A., and the 

Philos opened the rushing season. 



* 



■nber — Cont'd. 

6. Seniors appeared in their new jack- 
ets of black bearing numerals 
'28 in orange. 







Patt iss 






CALENDAR 



mber — Cont'd. 

S. Mrs. McCaulcy, past President of 
the American Legion Auxiliary, 
entertained us with her experi- 
ences at the Legion Convention 
held in Paris. 

9. The Philos sponsored a Christmas 
dance. 

14. Swut defeated Winona in a five- 

minute overtime period. 

15. "For the Love of Pete" and "Poor 

Maddelcna" were presented in the 
Auditorium. 

16. At 4:15 our vacation began. 
January — 

3. Everyone back for the reopening of 

school after the holidays. 

4. Fellows, keep a weather eye on the 

women; it's Leap Year. 

5. Punk Guyott was elected manager 

of the hockey team. 

6. The first dance of the leap year was 

held and we found many enter- 
prising young women in Stout 
Institute. Miss Balcrud an- 
nounced that the dancing class 
would be held every Saturday 
afternoon from now on. 



January — Cont'd. 

-. M.A.P. held a grand and glorious 
sleigh-ride party. 




10. Stout defeated the Red Birds in a 
fast, thrilling game. 22 to 20. 

12. low Sarctt, poet, woodsman, and 

professor, gave a matchless lec- 
ture-recital at the Lyceum and 
talked at a dinner given by Inky 
Fingers. 

Mr. Bowman told all about his 
trip to Los Angeles to the Ma 
cional Vocational Convention in 
issembly. 

13. The Stout Men's Glee Club enter- 

tained. 

14. We defeated Luther Phalen College 

here, 21 to 15. 



















Pate W 






h e 



E R 


































Pate ISS 






CALENDAR 



I 




. 



Fir\*lS 



4.nH Z » 



January — Cont'd. 

19. The skating rink down on the lot 
has been well used by the stu- 
dents. 

The first semester ended. 

The first mid-semester, semi-formal 
dance was given by the Hyperi- 
ans, Philos, and S.M.A.'s. The 
gym was beautifully decorated in 
blue, gold, and white. Everyone 
had an unusually good time. 



20. 
21. 






January — Cont'd. 

23. Registration day. Mr. Brown and 
Mr. Tustison are with us again, 
but Mr. Keith and Mr. Good are 
on leave of absence for the 
ond semester. 

26. The Faculty - Senior Basket - ball 
game held in the Stout Armory. 

30. Initiation Week ushered in. The 
society pledges are willing to per- 
form peculiar antics to placate 
the "actives" in each organiza- 
tion. 

February — 

2. The Stout Band, directed by Mr. 

Ingraham. entertained the stu- 
dent body in assembly. 

3. Stout Trainers leave to play their 

first conference games. River 
Falls and LaCrosse. 

9. Stout vs. Eau Claire. Result: 2j to 
22 in favor of Stout. Frosh won 
21 to 15. 




£da C I dire V«gnoui4K«.oj 



1'att 'S<> 




























I'oge '37 









CALENDAR 






/ ebruar} — Cont'd. 



10. LaCrosse defeated Stout here. J2 to 
17- 

15. Dr. Julian li. Arnold lecturing on 
widely varied subject*. 1 Ic is to 
be here three days. 




16. The Lyceum number was Dr. Hil- 
ton I. Jones, who lectured on 
Human Chemistry. He and Dr. 
Arnold were entertained at din- 
ner by the Science Club. 

2 J. The most gala event of the season. 

the MA.P. Costume Hall. 

Word received from President 
Nelson that Stout was admitted 
with A classification to the 
American Association of Teach- 
ers' ( ,o| leges. 

March— 

; . Superior defeats Stout on the local 
floor. 51 to 29. 

9. Three hundred rooters accompanied 

Stout Varsity to Eau Claire. 

Stout defeated by small icore, ; : 
to 28. 1 rosh won preliminary 

game, 19 to M. 








March — Cont'd. 

10. Hyperians entertained faculty of 

the School of Household Arts at 
a Spring Tea. 

M. News came from President Nelson 
that Stout had been accepted by 
the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Secondary 
SchooK. 

17. Stout Home Economics Club trans- 

formed the gym into an Irish 
bower and gave a St. Patrick's 
Cabaret Dance. 

18. Lynwood Hall entertained all of its 

friends at .\\\ Open House. 

I he men of' the school presented 
the assembly program. 

23. "Whens Your Birthday?" The 

M.A.P.s presented a play by that 
name. 

24. S.M.A. sponsored a Spring Matinee 

Dance. 

IS. Many students alarmed tor tear 
they will take the mumps, s, . 
eral cases in school. 




4 



J* 



Coeds' Seiitirnent turns to 



Lort&er- • h.aAr* 




















I'age 139 






CALENDAR 






March — Cont'd. 



28. Sally Martin was chosen Queen of 

the Second Annual Junior Prom 
by Ray Werner. 

29. The girls presented a fine musical 

program at assembly. 
There was keen competition at 
the girls' swimming meet. Th-.' 
Sophomores were victorious. 

April — 



1. When going on in April Fool's 
Day picnic be sure that the 
lunch - basket really contains 
food. (Names on req, 

•4. W"e spent a pleasant evening at the 
Girls' Glee Club Concert. 



6. Our three-day holiday begins with 
a snowstorm. 

-. More snow, and less amusement. 

8. Too wet under foot for hiking. 

9. The U. of W. Men's Glee Club sang 

for us under the auspices of the 
V.M.C.A. 

12. The Menomonie Commercial Club 
showed us some good vaudeville. 



Apr A — Cont'd. 

14. Matinee dance given by the S.S.A. 
Big athletic "pow-wow" held in 
cafeteria. Manv athletes from 
surrounding territory were pres- 
ent to hear Glenn Thistlewaite. 
head football coach at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

21. The second Annual Junior Prom 
drew a capacity crowd to the 

Gymnasium. 




2-. The last Tower benefit of the year 
took the form of a follies show. 

30. M.A.P. began rehearsals for the 
Commencement Play. 














Poxc no 



=1 
















>»> ZW/ Af *z 






Page 141 



T O W E P 






I had the swcllest little girl, 

A foull co-ed named Esther, 

She had the looks, but not the brains. — 

She's not here this semester. 



A ring on the hand is worth two on the phone. 



Instructor: "Give mc a sentence with the word analysis." 
Clayt: "Mary is my girl analysis her ristcr." 



DO\ I tSK Ml ANOTHER 

Mr. Davison: >X"ho was in command of the English at New York during the 
Revolution?" 

Banks (innocently): "How?" 
Mr. Davison: "Right!" 



George: "You know that five you owe mc?" 

Benny: "Ya." 

George: "\X'cll. don't worry about it; there's no use of both of us worrying about 
it." 



Prof: "U'hat is meant by expansion and contraction caused by the various tem- 
peratures?" 

Stude: ' VX'ell. when a thing gets cold it gets smaller and when it gets hot 
larger." 

Prof.: "Give an example of each." 

Stude: "In winter the days arc short because it is cold; and in summer, when it 
is warm, the days arc long." 



"NX ill you support the Tower?" 
"I understand they have a staff." 



Elva: "Gee. you think you're wise." 

Edith: ">X'cll. I am wise. I'm $o wise no one understands mc. 















Pat* '*•' 






T h 





















Page 143 



T O W E 









Lives of Seniors all remind us, 
We should strive to do our best, 
And departing leave behind us, 
Notebooks that will help the rest. 



Miss Balcrud to Gym class: "Lots of girls use dumb-bells to get color in their 
cheeks.'* 

Bright One: "And lots of girls use color on their cheeks to get dumb-bells." 



CO- (watching football game): 'What's the matter with that play"'*' 

ED: "Nothing. What's ailing your sight?" 

CO-: "Well, the Captain yelled, 'Punk Formation." 



Julian: "You want to keep your eyes open when you go through the Home 
Economics Building tomorrow." 
Art: -\Y\v 
Julian: "Well, you would look funny with your eyes closed." 



K.ischak: "Tomsic. for Pete's sake, close that door. There's a draft in here; do 
you want to catch a cold?" 

Tommy: "Don't talk so much and there won't be a draft." 



TRIPS TO THE DEAN 

First Time: Accident. 
Second Time: Coincidence. 
Third Time: Bad habit. 



Lyn: "Look out, or you will swallow that spoon!" 
Wood: "Don't worry; I am hanging on to the other end." 



Ann: "What makes that new baby at your house cry so much, Ne\?" 

Nex: "It doesn't cry so much. And. anyway, if you had all your hair off 

and your teeth out, and your legs were so weak you couldn't stand on them, I guess 

you'd feel like crying, too." 









The 































Page 145 















Miss Baker: "I dislike chewing gum in the classroom and on the dance floor." 



Senior: "Don't step on my SENIOR JACKET. It is like stepping on the Ameri- 
can flag." 



Charleston: "Oh. so you're a Southerner, too. Where is your home?" 
Brooks: "Wilmar, Southern Minnesota." 



A. Thorsen: "Talk about your law-breakers at Home-makers'. Why, even the 

baby is one." 

M. Blair: "How do you reason?" 

A. Thorsen: "Anti-prohibitionist. Must hive her bottle!" 



Soggc: "Say, kids. I know where we can get the best chicken dinners for fifteen 



cents. 



The Gang: "Where?" 
Sogge: "At a teed store." 



"Shall I brain him?" cried the Sophomore, and the victim's courage fled. 
"No. you cannot: he's a Freshman; so just hit him on the head." 



Kokomo says that when he gets to the top of the ladder of success, he isn't going 
to remember the ones who held it for him, because he will have used a step-ladder. 



Student: "Where are you now in Economics?' 
Same: "In the last stages of Consumption." 




































<~fc! 



*$m 



totMTE 





HtH 












Page 147 



h e 












BEFORE VACATION 

Little bank roll, ere we part, 
Let me hug you to my Heart, 
For a year I've clung to you. 
I've been faithful, you've been true. 

AFTER VACATION 

Little bank roll, one glad day 

You and I both went away 

To a gay and festive spot. 

I've come back, but — you have not! 



Josephine: "Did you ever take chloroform?" 
Anita: "No, who teaches it?" 



In the spring the Stout man's fancy 
Swiftly turns to thoughts of canoes- 



The pen is mightier than the sword, but beware who runs the pen. 



Our forefathers did wonderful things. 

Sh, it's all right to talk about your family tree if it isn't too shady. 



First Flea: "Been on a hike?" 
Second Flea: "Xo, on a tramp.' 



Prof: "Before a man is married he is a dude. After he is married he is subdued." 





















Poet us 



y\ 















• 






















T O 









Tusty, entering one of the coaches on the Eau Claire Special train: 
cials sent me in here to chaperone the faculty.'' 



"Well, the offi- 



He: "Shall \vc waltz?" 
She: "It's all the same to me." 
"Ye$, I've noticed that." 



Found on Homesick's registration card: 
Name of Parents: Papa and Mama. 



"Well, anyway," said the optimistic chemistry student, who had just swall 
a test tube of mercury. "I've got some metal in me at last." 



Miss Bachman (in Biologv : "The class will new name some of the species of in- 
sects starting with Mr. F. Greeley." 



A LESSON' IN GRAMMAR 



You sec .1 beautiful girl walking down the street. She is, of course, feminine. If 
she is singular, you become nominative. You walk across to her. changing the verbal 
and then becoming dative. You walk home together. Her mother is accusative and 
you become imperative. Her brother is an indefinite article. You walk in and sit 
down. You talk of the future and change to the object. Her father becomes present 
and \ou become the past participle. 



Two Stout boys were discussing a coming double date. 
The Other One: "Where are we going tonight?' 
Big Pete: "Don't know; will have to ask thj boss." 












Page 151 

























Page i$i 






• 



S. Cotton: "That girl sure is graceful." 

H. Rysberg: "How come?" 

S. Cotton: "I didn't step on her toes once." 



G. Merdutt: "What kind of shoes do ycu think I ought to wear with these goH 
J. Notebaart: "Hip boots." 



Student reviewing Chemistry: "What is chj best solvent for gold?" 
Roommate: "Matrimony." 



First Roer..: ace: "What is the formula for carbon monoxkh?" 

Second Roommate: 

First Roommate: "What is the formula f dioxide?" 

Second Roommate: 

First Roommate: "Why. how funny. I thought they were two different things. 



Kamm (in St. Paul): "Lcok at : : Aren't they numerous?" 

Koccmo: "Yes. and ain't there a lot of th.-m?" 



"What's that awful noise in the hall?" 
"Bill Dumb Just dropped three subjects." 



"Oh, you don't know how much we depend on the mail." 
Precept rcsv: "Yes. and I know how you spell that word, too.' 



Mr. Welch: "Say, Richards, what is your interpretation of co-ordir 
Richards: "Well, a-a-a-a-a. that's when we get together and co-ordinate." 















Page r>-- 









I 









< 






































Tin-: l n ( iHK i a>:\s i.ovi: sox; 



Within my heart, throughout the past, 

Science predominated, 

And through magnetic fields it passed 
Completely insulated. 

Those bodies, charged .imi dangerous, 
That struggle CO entwine us. 

Passed near me, registering plus. 
But I was always minus. 

And then I came within your field; 

'Twas surely providential. 
I or. suddenly. I felt, revealed. 

The force of your potential. 

Your power is ruthlessly applied. 

Ever I thrill .\nd quiver 
Mure positively electrified. 

But you are negativer? 

\ou flee away from me. 
As if my love confounded JTOUJ 
Where is your conductivity, 

\ las sonic disaster grounded you? 

The force between US, vou're aware. 

You'll pardon my insistence. 
Varies inversely as the square 

Oi intervening distance. 

Who has short-circuited our 
Let's banish all deterrents 

And turn our intermittent sparks 
To alternating currents! 

My voltage is tremendous; oh, 

1 would your heart were warmer, 

I wish I were your dynamo, 

And you were my transformer! 










P*tge IS4 









I 






THE MENOMONIE SECTION 

EDITOR'S NOTE: 

This section cf The Tower is paid for by Menomonie business men who believe in 
advertising which will benefit their city in general. The story and photographs which 
follow give the reader complete and worthwhile information regarding the city of 
Mcncmonie. We are indeed glad to include this section in our book, and wish to thank 
the men who made it possible. The following business houses are Tower boosters; give 
them your patronage. 



.American bakery Materials Company 

Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company 

S. K. Andreassen, D.V.S. 

Xels Anshus, Jeweler 

Badger State Lumber Company 

Bailey Insurance Agency 

Bank of Menomonie 

Belair Studio. Photographer 

Boothby Print Shop 

Boston Drug Store 

D. A. Bowerman, D.D.S. 
S. Brace, D.D.S. 

Mrs. I). C. Brennan, Kitchen Shop 

A. J. Brummond. Tinsmith 

A. E. Bryant. DA s. 

C. & O. Livery, "Rent-a-Car" 

W. H. Carrington, Barber 

C .uier Ice & Fuel Company 

Central House & Bus Station 

( hase & Wagner, Candy Shoppe 

City Fuel & Storage ( ompany 

( . I . Clark. D.D.S. 

F. A. Clark, Attorney 

Clear Oil Company 

Diamond Hat Shop 

Herbert Dixon, Wholesale Shoes 

Doorway Pastry Shop 

John Duesing, Insurance 

Dunn Count) News 

Eau Claire Press 

Ehrhard & Quilling, Dn 

Evens-Tobin, Clothiers 

I Kcelsior Brick Company 

Fanners' Store Company, Gen'I Mdse. 

E. A. Peldt, Grocer 
1 irst National Bank 

I. D. lisher. Variety Store 

Flick Auto Company 

Puller Auto Company 

C. A. Fuller, D.D.S. 

Gamble Auto Supply Company 

Golden Rule, Variety Store 

Goodrich Furniture Store 

Graven & Wilcox, Shoes 

Gregg's Music Store 

Harry Halberg, Painting & Decorating 

Hamerlv, P. H., Monument Dealer 



Hansen Tire Shop 
\l. A. 1 l.mson. Postmaster 
V. W. Harrington, D.D.S. 
1 base's Apparel Shop 
Dr. A. F. Heising 
A. I ■ I lerrem, Tailor 
Frank Hint/man, Furniture 
J. T. Holstein, Meat Market 

I losi'ord. Electric Shop 
Hotel Marion. Nick Jcatran. Prop. 

Ingraham Bros. & Torrey, Jewelers 

S. B. Ingram. life Insurance 

A. J. Josephson, Dry Goods and 

Ready to 
[ungck Hardware Company 

n Kabot, Northwest Finance Co. 
Kraft State Bank 
Anna Preiser, Beauty Parlor 

I. Kyle, Osteopath 
Lakeview Barber Shop 
I ammer's GrOCerj 
1 1. \\ . I aramy, Chiropractor 
I ee's Drug Store 
Dr. W'm, Lumsden 
Ole Madsen. Jeweler 

M. A. M.utison 
J. A. McClellan, Oil Station 
Menomonie Auto Company 
Menomonie baking Company 
Menomonie Clinic 
Menomonie Dairy Company 
Menomonie Dye House 
Mcnomonie-Eau Claire Nurseries, Inc. 

Menomonie Fuel & Supply Company 
Menomonie Gas Company 
Menomonie Greenhouse 
Menomonie Grocer Company 
Menomonie Hudson- 1 iSSex Sales 
Menomonie Insurance Agency 
Menomonie Oil Company 
Menomonie Shoe Shining Parlor 
Menomonie Table Supply 
John Meyer, Tailor 
Micheels Clothes Shop 
Milady's Shoppe. Beaut\ Parlor 
Miller Smoke Shop 
C. J. Mower, Grocer 















Pag* i.vi 



.MKiN OMOME SECTION— Continued 



I. W. Messer, Barber 

Nestle's Food Company 

Xocr Drug Company 

Northern States Power Company 

A. R. Olson, Art Store 

Carl Olson, Undertaker 

Olympia Confectionery 

O. & X. Lumber Company 

< )ae Minute Lunch 

Patterson Shop, 

ions & Ready-to- Wear 
Peerless Grill, "Home of Good Food" 
Carl E. Peterson, Mayor 
( . A. Pinkepank, Grocer 
Randle's Service Station 
Red Owl Groc 

Richardson & Richardson, Chiropractors 
Rudiger Radio Shop 
Schneider Brothers. City Meat Market 
August SchcenofT, Plumbing 
Shaker Studio, Photographer 



J. E. Sleeper 
Smith Brothers, 

Orphcum & Grand Theatres 
Standard Oil Company 
Drs. Steves, Halgrcn & Long 
C. B. Stone, Life Insurance 

A. Summerheld, Men's & I aches' Clothes 

I kins Swenby, Furniture 

Vvcnson & Berndt, Shoes 

Robert Taufman. Mgr. Express Office 

Ttare Clothing Company 

O. A. Tilleson, Meats 

Vanity Beauty Parlor 

Volp's Grocery 

W'ehrle Apparel Shop 

Henry Will, Marion Barber Shop 

Williams Bros.. Hdwc. & Machinery 

Wilson I and & Lumber Company 

Winona Oil Company 

Wisconsin Milling Company 








/'<»** 1*7 
















Si \ \ i or James H. Stout 

Pioneer Mcnomonie Business Man 

and 

Founder of The Stout Institute 

To Whose Memory 

This Section of The Tower Is Dedicated 









Pane 13S 




























THE FOUNDER OF STOUT 

AN EDUCATIONAL PIONEER 

*/•? f HI. late Senator James H. Stout, lumberman, pioneer in education, and promi- 

| |"^ neni citizen of Mencmonie, was the founder of the famous school that car- 

V I y rics his name. Mr. Stout was a man of far vision and philanthropic tendencies. 

"* He had an intense and generous interest in the welfare of humanity. He loved 

the boys and girls and they loved and admired him. It may be said that his later life 

was diligently devoted to the unfolding of an idea that had for its purpose the practical 

training of the mind and hand of the young people. 

The school had its beginning in 1890 in a small way and from that time until his 
death in 1910 Mr. Stout's educational activities grew in interest and widened in scope 
with the development of The Stout Institute. 

Mr. Stout's efforts in the service of education brought him to the front in a con- 
spicuous way in Wisconsin, and as the school grew his work came into national promi- 
nence. 

No sketch of his life in brief space can do justice to the man and his service to 
humanity. He gave unsparingly, unselfishly of his time, thought, and mone> to the 
upbuilding of the school that he had conceived for the "promotion of learning, skill, 
industry, and honor." 

Mencmonie. home of The Stout Institute, claims marked advantages from many 
viewpoints. Not only is it known throughout the country as a city of educational 
initiative, but it is commanding increasing attention for other excellent reasons. It 
is noted as a city of good homes, .i city about which revolves the life of a rich, 
progressive, and promising agricultural community; the center of almost unlimited water 
power, developed and undeveloped; a city which holds forth exceptional prospects to the 
manufacturer; favored with splendid transportation facilities, it invites the attention 
of those interested in distribution; located on the banks of the Red Cedar River and 
Lake Menomin and surrounded by a beautiful country in which abound streams that arc 









Page i& 
















well stocked with fish, it is in the heart of a paradise for the disciples of Izaak W.ilton, 
while the fertile prairies and restful valleys within easy distance are a lure alike to the 
home seeker and the tourist. 

Among the industries which support this thriving community, agriculture must 
he accorded first position. Originally a part of the great timber district and the seat of 
the operations of the famous Knapp, Stout and Company, lumber manufacturers, Dunn 
County has gradually evolved into one of the richest farming areas in Northern Wis- 
consin. Dairying is the line of farming that is most favored and a tour through 
the districts contiguous to Mcnominic invariably surprises the traveler by the character 
of the farm homes which it reveals. Wisconsin is known as the greatest dairy state 
in the Union and Dunn County ranks among the highest of the seventy-one counties 
of the state in the output of butter. All of the cattle in Dunn County have been 
tested for tuberculosis by the State of Wisconsin. Milk that is produced by healthy cows 
has a greater value and is safer for children. Hogs from counties that have had their 
cattle tested sell at a higher price on the market. 

While Mcnomonie is essentially an agricultural community as a center of a rich 
dairy section, dotted with flourishing creameries and cheese factories, it has a splendid 
representation along industrial lines. Prominent in the industries are three large 
brickyards, tapping inexhaustible beds of finest clay. The flour industry likewise com- 
mands especial attention. Products of these industries go to all parts of the world. 
One of the largest manufacturers of hardwood lumber in the state has its headquarters 
in Mcnomonie as does also one of the large chains of lumber yards. A piano factory, 
nurseries, and greenhouses, cigar factories, metal works, and dairy enterprises, including 
several large creameries, cheese factories, and a condensery contribute to a liberal 
payroll for Mcnomonie workmen. 

Menomonie's retail facilities provide ^n exceptional service. The city is a trade 
center for a large area, attracting shoppers for miles around by the complete, up-to-date, 
and high quality stocks of goods. Wholesale establishments are also well represented. 












Page 160 













Strong, growing banks form a vital part of the business lite of Menomonie and 
provide complete financial facilities for the needs of the community. The deposits in 
these banks will aggregate about S7. 000, 000. 

The City of Menomonie is under the Commission Form of Government, govern- 
mental affairs being in the hands of a mayor and two councilmen. How well the 
people are satisfied with this system was indicated in the fall of 1920, when by an 
overwhelming vote the electors decided not to return to the old aldermanic form. The 
city has several miles of well paved streets, a line white way system in the business 
district, and many imposing public and private buildings which give the place a 
metropolitan aspect. Among the public buildings may be mentioned the commanding 
structures which form the home of The Stout Institute, a Federal Building, a Masonic 
Temple, County Court I louse. City Hall, and the Mabel Tainter Memorial, a beautiful 
stone edifice presented to the city about thirty \cars ago by the late Capt. Andrew 
Tainter, which contains a completely equipped theatre, public library, rooms for the 
G. A. R., and W. R. C, amusement room, and dining rooms available for public use. 

Menomonie has several fraternal organizations with large, active memberships. 
Among them is Hosford-Chase Post No. 3 2, the American Legion, which in conjunction 
with its Auxiliary unit, maintains club rooms, where visiting Legionnaires are always 

welcome. 

Within the city are a number of musical groups, including the famous Ludington 
Guard Band, one of the best in the state, which has been in existence for many years. 
The summer concerts given on Tuesday evenings by this band from their shell in 
Wilson Park draw thousands of people from the surrounding country. 

The city maintains a fine public hospital at which the charges are made as 
reasonable as possible. It owns several parks, in addition to which arc a beautiful 
parkway along the lake front, another along Wilson Creek Boulevard, and other pleasure 
grounds along the lake and streams, owned and controlled by the Menomonie Improve- 
ment Association. 






: 



Pag e 161 






E R 




























The Mcnomonie Country Club enjoys a splendid nine hole golf course of in- 
comparable beauty. Situated one mile from the city, on Federal Highways 10 and 12 
and State Highway 79. on the banks of Wilson Creek, the location is ideal. Par for 
the nine holes is 56. The Club House is provided with dressing and lounging rooms 
for the men and women, showers, a pro and caddy room, a well equipped kitchen. 
a large dance and dining hall. The Country Club is available for use by visitors in 
Mcnomonie, and students of the summer school of The Stout Institute have the 
privilege of its use through arrangements with the school authorities. 

The spiritual requirements of the community are provided for by several churches. 
The Congregational, Roman Catholic, two German Lutheran, Episcopal, Methodist 
Episcopal, Baptist, Norwegian Lutheran, and Evangelical Association groups have sub- 
stantial church homes. Several have commodious parsonages. The pastors are men 
of ability and the auxiliary organizations reach out into the community life in a way 
to greatly extend the church influence. 

A school nurse is regularly employed in connection with the public schools so 
that with the health and poor departments of the city government the needs of the 
people in these respects are well provided for. 

By its last census. Mcnomonie has a population of 5,104, but in appearance, enter- 
prise, and business activity it is ahead of most cities of its size. 

Its position as county seat of Dunn County makes it the official as well as the 
geographical and commercial center of the county. A circumstance which illustrates 
the importance of the city in relation to the surrounding country is the fact that ten 
rural free delivery routes emanate from the Mcnomonie postomcc, a number larger 
than that of any other county scat in Wisconsin. 



Page i6i 




















Representing the commercial, industrial, civic, and social life of the community 
is the Menomonic Commercial Club, an active body of citizens whose endeavor is to 
make Menomonic a better city in the four lines indicated. The club is housed in 
the Masonic Temple, and its quarters are a convenient gathering place for many move- 
ments seeking the betterment of local conditions. The club is ever alert to welcome 
the newcomer and an interest in which it prides itself is that of seeing that Mcnomonie 
is known as "the city of a square deal.*' 

Menomonic is easily accessible to the motorist. The city is located on live Federal 
or State trunk highways. Federals 10 and 12 run diagonally across Wisconsin, forming 
a direct artery from Menomonic to southern Wisconsin and Chicago and a direct 
route CO Manitowoc. Highways 25 and -') run north and south and 29 east and west, 
providing a center for a network of important highways chat make it convenient for 
the motorist to reach Mcnomonie. located about sixty-seven miles cast of St. Paul, 
the city is reached by two important railway systems, the Chicago, St. Paul. Minneapolis 
& Omaha (comprising part of the Northwestern system) and the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railway. Motor busses operate frequently on Highways 10 and 12. 

The Hotel Marion offers resident guests and the traveling public modern ac- 
commodations by virtue of the complete renovation of the Hotel Royal and the ad- 
dition of a strictly fireproof annex. Fifty-two rooms comprise the capacity of the 
new hotel; all have running water, telephone, and other modern appointments, while 
a large number are provided with private bath, line accommodations are also available 
at the Central House and other hotels. 









Page 163 



















THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Emerson said, "Every great institution is the lengthening shadow of a great man." 
The truth of Emerson's statement is well illustrated here in Menomonie. Becatli 
Senator Stout's position on the Board of Education of the Menomonie Public Schools, 
the shadow took shape and grew into the present Stout Institute. It was to the Public 
Schools that Senator Stout first turned his attention and it was in them that many of 
his progressive ideas were worked out. There is still reflected in the Public Schools 
much of the early progress which was developed when ideas new in educational thought 
were put into practice here. 

The schools are organized along the lines suggested by the best modern practice 
into the senior high school, a junior high school, the intermediate and elementary grades, 
and kindergarten. The senior high school comprises the 10th, I lth, and 12th grades 
and has about 300 students. The junior high school comprises the 7th. 8th, and 9th 
grades and has about 250 students. 

The courses of study in the senior and junior high school arc organized around the 
five major fields of educational interest, namely: English, Foreign Languages, Science. 
History, and Mathematics. In addition to these, vocational work, manual training. 
home economics, and commerce arc also taught. Opportunity for work in music and 
the fine arts is also offered. The school maintains, at a high standard, a band, mi 
orchestra, and glee clubs for both boys and girls. A pupil with musical ability will find 
opportunity and encouragement to develop his talent. 















Pate 164 



















The junior high school program is arranged to give the pupil a large numbs 
comparatively brief contacts with the field of education. In other words, it pro- 
poses to give the students a sample of each subject that the senior high school has to 
offer. With this experience the student can enter the senior high school, knowing in 
a way his likes and dislikes, his special abilities, and with reasonable freedom of 
election select those lines <>t work which suit his interest best. Especial mention should 
be made ol the exceptional opportunity for work along lines of manual training and 
home economics which is open to the high school students. All the facilities of Stout 
are available for this work, giving it a range and equipment far beyond that found 
in the average public school. 

As proof of the quality of the high school work we point to the fact that the school 
is on the accredited list of the North Centra] Association of Colleges. This rating .; 
its graduates to enter without examination any college or university in the eighteen 
states comprising the Association. 

The health of the children is carefully guarded. A graduate nurse is a regular 
member of the teaching force. She visits each room practically every day. Cont.v 
diseases are detected promptly and epidemics prevented. Defects of eyes, ears, teeth. 
and throat arc discovered and recommendation for correction made to the parent. 
Under-nourished children arc formed into nutrition classes which meet for dinner one 
day each week. In addition, under-nourished children are detected and with the ap- 
proval of the parents are given one feeding of milk each day at school. Correct foods 
are emphasized at the weekly luncheon. In Menomonie, parents can send their children 




























to school with confidence that their health will not be jeopardized; rather, under 
the caret ul supervision, the child has a chance to grow up not only mentally bait 
physically. 

On the whole Menomonie Public Schools are a decided credit to the city. They 
could be better schools; in fact, a virile public sentiment will make them better schools 
each year. The spirit of Senator Stout still lives in the hearts of Menomonie citizens. 
And always their public schools will spell to their boys and girls the one big American 
word. Opportunity. 

Menomonie also has several other schools, including the school of the St. PauPs 
Lutheran congregation and that of the St. Joseph's parish. The former represents a 
congregation consisting of some three hundred families; the latter has a school en- 
rollment varying between 110 and 12< pupils. 

The Dunn County School building is located in Menomonie. This houses the 
Rural Normal School and the county agricultural school. 

The Rural Normal School was one of the first to be opened in Wisconsin, having 
been started in September. 1899. Since September, 1924, it has had the Bowman 
Mode! School, which furnishes adequate opportunity for demonstration of methods 
and for practice teaching. 

The Dunn County School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy has several 
buildings adjacent to the main building. A tour year course in Agriculture and a four 
year course in Domestic Economy are otTcrcd. Several other shorter courses are also 
available. Active extension work is carried out along many lines through the county. 









Page 166 






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DUNN NORMA! 



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Kiffiii^iiri^Buiii»iiu.iffli l |B.iiTmnnnmmm TT ^- 






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Part Jfr 






E R 



THANK YOU 

/~1 N closing the 1928 Tower, the Staff wishes 
^■j ^-4 co make graceful acknowledgement to 
^^_^ chose who have mads the publication of 
this rn.iteri.il possible. To the advisors and to other 
instructors for their helpful counsel; to chs student 
body for its generous response co all requests; to 
chs advertisers for their live interest in the school 
and its yearbook, the builders of this book express 
their sincere thanks. 

The engravings in this beck were made b) 
chs Buckbce-Mcars Company, of Saint Paul. Minne- 
sota. 

The book was printed by the McGill-Warncr 
( ompany, of Saint Paul, Minnesota. 




111! TOVI'LR 



The engravings in this Ixmk were made by the 
Ike kiii i -Mi \r% COMPANY, 

oi Saint Paul, Minnesota. 
The book was printed by the McGiia-Wahneh Company, 

of Saint Paul, Minnesota. 












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